Campaign Musings January 30, 2015: Romney announces he will not run for president in 2016 campaign

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Romney announces he will not run for president in 2016 campaign

By Bonnie K. Goodman

January 30, 2015

Mitt Romney the 2012 Republican Presidential nominee has made his plans for the 2016 presidential campaign definitive, announcing Friday morning, Jan. 30, 2015 in two conference calls to advisors and supporters that he has decided against a third run…READ MORE

Campaign Musings January 26, 2015: Romney beats Hillary Clinton on Facebook if not in the 2016 campaign polls

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Romney beats Hillary Clinton on Facebook if not in the 2016 campaign polls

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Although Democrats Hillary Clinton seems to be beating all her potential Republican presidential campaign opponents including frontrunner Mitt Romney, she loses according to Facebook. Clinton does not even have her own official page on the social networking site, only one…READ MORE

Campaign Musings January 23, 2015: Sarah Palin announces “of course” she is interested in 2016 presidential run

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Sarah Palin announces “of course” she is interested in 2016 presidential run

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Americans can add another former candidate to the list of potential Republican presidential candidate for the 2016 campaign, on Friday, Jan. 23, 2015 Sarah Palin announced that “Of course” she is interested in running in the 2016 presidential…READ MORE

Campaign Musings January 22, 2015: Romney Bush meeting leads to no solutions, both still intent on running in 2016

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Romney Bush meeting leads to no solutions, both still intent on running in 2016

By Bonnie K. Goodman

In what must have been a very awkward meeting, Mitt Romney and Jeb Bush,who are considering running for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, got together on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The former…READ MORE

Campaign Musings January 18, 2015: CBS poll declares Romney GOP 2016 frontrunner Bush has no chance against Clinton

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

CBS poll declares Romney GOP 2016 frontrunner Bush has no chance against Clinton

By Bonnie K. Goodman

CBS News released a new poll on Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015 examined, which candidates American voters would like to see in the 2016 presidential campaign from the Democratic or Republican Parties. According to the public Both Romney and Hillary Clinton…READ MORE

Campaign Musings January 14, 2015: Romney top Iowa choice in new poll as he prepares 2016 presidential campaign

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Romney top Iowa choice in new poll as he prepares 2016 presidential campaign

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush may have announced his pre-Presidential campaign, but 2012 Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney tops the most recent Iowa poll. In a new poll conducted by Townhall and Gravis Marketing and released on Tuesday, Jan…READ MORE

Campaign Musings January 13, 2015: GOP 2016 Romney vs Bush, Paul Ryan out, Romney decided on presidential run?

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

GOP 2016 Romney vs Bush, Paul Ryan out, Romney decided on presidential run?

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Wisconsin Congressman and 2012 Republican Vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan announced on Twitter on Monday afternoon, Jan. 12, 2015 that he will not run for president in the 2016 presidential campaign. As Ryan announced that he will not run, he….READ MORE

Campaign Musings January 9, 2015: Romney reveals to NYC donors he is seriously considering 2016 presidential run

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Romney reveals to NYC donors he is seriously considering 2016 presidential run

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Mitt Romney will probably run for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, according to reports. The 2012 GOP nominee and Former Massachusetts Governor told a group of New York City Republican donors on Friday, Jan. 9, 2015 that he is “…READ MORE

Campaign Musings December 28, 2014: Jeb Bush leads GOP 2016 presidential field in new CNN poll that excludes Romney

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

alt=”http://historymusings.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/pol_musings.jpg?w=600″ width=”500″ height=”80″ />

OBAMA PRESIDENCY & THE 113TH CONGRESS:

Jeb Bush leads GOP 2016 presidential field in new CNN poll that excludes Romney

By Bonnie K. Goodman

According to a new CNN/ORC poll released on Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014 a clear front runner emerges for the 2016 Republican Presidential nomination, former Florida governor Jeb Bush, who leads the pack of potential candidates by 10 points. In…READ MORE

Campaign Musings December 21, 2014: Clinton loses ground in new poll as Warren challenges her 2016 coronation

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Clinton loses ground in new poll as Warren challenges her 2016 coronation

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Hillary Clinton is always struggling against presidential candidate spoilers, in 2008 there was Barack Obama, now Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren. A new poll from ABC News/Washington Post released Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014 shows the former first lady, New…READ MORE

Campaign Musings November 26, 2014: Romney top GOP choice for 2016 campaign, would win over Hillary Clinton

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Romney top GOP choice for 2016 campaign, would win over Hillary Clinton

By Bonnie K. Goodman

The Republican Party wants Mitt Romney for their nominee in the 2016 presidential campaign, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll released on Wednesday morning, Nov. 26, 2014. In the poll, the former 2012 Republican candidate tops the pool of…READ MORE

Campaign Musings October 23, 2014: Mitt Romney and Hillary Clinton top 2016 presidential campaign polls

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

CAMPAIGN MUSINGS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Mitt Romney and Hillary Clinton top 2016 presidential campaign polls

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Two new polls from last week prove Americans want a Hillary Clinton, Mitt Romney match-up in the 2016 presidential campaign. A new ABC News/Washington Post poll was released on Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014 looking at the 2016 Election…READ MORE

2004: John Kerry

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

AMERICAN HISTORY REFERENCE

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

2004 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN: JOHN KERRY

John Forbes Kerry was the 2004 Democratic Party presidential nominee, where he challenged the incumbent and Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush. Kerry, born in 1943 like his opponent, he was a patrician, attending St. Paul prep school and then Yale University and Boston College Law School. Kerry had been a decorated Vietnam veteran, who then decided to oppose the war joining the anti-war movement and testifying in front of Congress against the war. Kerry, a lawyer by trade was elected to the Senate from Massachusetts in 1984. Kerry first announced his intentions for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination after his resounding senatorial reelection in November 2002. Then on December 1, 2002 during an appearance on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Kerry announced he is planning to form a presidential exploratory committee. [1] Kerry’s pre-campaign started strong leading in early polls and in fundraising.

 

Kerry made his formal campaign announcement on September 2, 2003 at the “USS Yorktown in Charleston, South Carolina,” where he declared; “I believe that the courage of Americans can change this country.”[2] By the fall of 2003 however, Kerry’s campaign was faltering while Former Vermont Governor Howard Dean was securing his front-runner status.[3] Kerry was lagging in the national and New Hampshire polls, falling to the single digits and not receiving any significant endorsements. In November 2003, Kerry fired his campaign manager Jim Jordan. Fellow Massachusetts Democratic Senator Ted Kennedy endorsed him and informally advised Kerry on his campaign, and suggested that Kerry add Mary Cahill, who had his been his chief-of staff to be Kerry’s new campaign manager. Kerry then ramped up his campaign fundraising to compete with both Dean and Bush, including lending his own funds by taking a mortgage on his Beacon Hill Massachusetts home. [4]

 

Kerry refocused his campaign on his strengths particularly his foreign policy expertise as a member of the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee, and his decorated military service in the Vietnam War. [5]In the field of Democratic candidates, Kerry appeared the most moderate in his position on the issues, which was a contrast with his liberal Senate voting record. [6] Kerry attempted to look presidential at all times during the campaign. Kerry’s background however, from an elite family, that was not necessarily wealthy, made him appear as an elitist removed from the populist message and middle-class voters he was trying to appeal to and remained an obstacle throughout the entire campaign. [7] What helped Kerry the most was Dean’s campaign problems in the weeks before the primaries were set to begin. [8]

 

Kerry surged in the polls prior to the Iowa caucus, held January 19, 2004 on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. The man Kerry saved in Vietnam Jim Rassmann came to Kerry’s defense despite the fact that they had not been in contact since 1969. Rassmann flew to Iowa and recounted Kerry’s “heroics” during the war cementing Kerry as the war hero.[9] In a surprise victory, Kerry won the Iowa Caucus with nearly 38 percent of the vote; Senator John R. Edwards, second with 32 percent of the vote; Dean came in third, winning 18.6 percent of votes.[10] Kerry starting using the “Comeback Kerry” slogan[11] and after the Iowa caucus Dean became a non-factor, because at his post-caucus rally he “screamed” over the loud crowd, which was caught on video and replayed on TV and online, and became known as the “Dean Scream.”[12]

 

The momentum for Kerry continued into the New Hampshire primary held on January 27, 2004 where Kerry won 39 percent of the vote.[13] Kerry became the frontrunner because Democratic voters viewed him as the more electable candidate able to run and possibly win against Bush.[14] Kerry participated in the sixteen Democratic primary debates held in the “invisible” primary campaign period.[15] The first primary was held on April 9, 2003 with the last one on February 29, 2004. It was during the last two debates on January 22, 2004 in Manchester, New Hampshire and then on January 29, 2004 in Greenville, South Carolina where Kerry appeared as the eventual Democratic presidential candidate.[16]

 

The next obstacle was “Mini-Tuesday” or Super Tuesday I on February 3, 2004, where seven primaries were held. Kerry won a majority including Arizona, Delaware, Missouri, New Mexico and North Dakota. Only two other candidates won that night Clark won Oklahoma; Edwards won South Carolina. Lieberman dropped out of the campaign after losing Delaware. Afterwards it was smooth sailing for Kerry, who won the remaining Democratic primaries, with the exception of Vermont, which Dean won after he withdrew from the race. On March 2, Kerry won nine primaries on “Super Tuesday II,”[17] he was at this point considered the presumptive candidate and his rival President Bush called to congratulate him. Kerry clinched the Democratic Presidential nomination on March 11, 2004 by accumulating the necessary 2,162 delegates.[18]

 

Edwards was Kerry’s main competition especially among young voters, but he could not garner enough delegates to be actual be a threat to Kerry, because he only won one state South Carolina.[19] Edwards withdraw from the Democratic Presidential race on March 3, 2004 and his speech he praised Kerry. Kerry in return called Edwards a “valiant champion of the values for which our party stands.”[20] Most of the Democrats withdrew their candidacies after Kerry clinched the nomination, only Dennis Kuninch remained in the race through right before the convention withdrawing on July 22.

 

The time between the clinching the nomination and the national convention formally nominating a candidate, which launches the general election is a difficult time for a candidate as it was for Kerry.[21] The major issues and battles between Kerry and Bush were defined in those months. The major problem with the Kerry campaign was the lack of clearly defined campaign message. The campaign two major issues were national security and the economy. The War in Iraq was a major issue, and Kerry could not separate himself from the president. Kerry had endorsed and voted for Bush’s invasion into Iraq, and in the campaign he did not express regret or renounce doing so, and did not run against the invasion instead he chose to argue only against Bush’s implementation and execution of the war.[22]

 

Kerry’s Senate voting record was overanalyzed and he was accused of not support funding for the troop in Afghanistan and Iraq. Kerry was defined as a flip flopper both for his vote for the Iraq War and then after opposing it and for the excuse he made for voting to fund the troops only when the bill was attached to an amendment cutting the Bush tax cuts, for which he then opposed after the bill failed to pass. During a March 16 address at Marshall University Kerry explained; “I actually did vote for the $87 billion before I voted against it.”[23] The quote helped attribute the flip-flopper label to Kerry that the Bush campaign used to their advantage and defined Kerry the whole campaign.[24] Additionally, despite Kerry’s Senate experience, the Bush campaign also attacked Kerry as too inexperienced to helm the War on Terror and national security in the age of terrorism. Kerry’s response was “If George Bush wants to make national security the central issue of 2004, I have three words that I know he understands — Bring. It. On.”[25]

 

Kerry tried to keep up his campaign’s momentum from the time he clinched the nomination until the Democratic convention by fuelling the ongoing media speculation about his choice of running mate. Towards the end of June, Kerry at first announced a short list of potential running mates that consisted of Sen. John Edwards, Rep. Dick Gephardt, and Gov. Tom Vilsack.[26] Then on July 6 Kerry announced that he chose Edwards as his running mate for the Democratic ticket where their new slogan became “stronger at home and more respected in the world.” Choosing Edwards did not give Kerry’s campaign boost at the polls or otherwise, and neither did Edwards bring much in terms of potential votes. [27]

 

The Democratic National Convention convened from July 26-29 at the Fleet Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico served as the chairman. The convention nominated on Kerry (Massachusetts) for President the first ballot, and Edwards (North Carolina) by acclamation for Vice President.[28] The main issues focused on were terrorism and the war in Iraq, health care, taxes, and economic revival. Since Kerry’s military service was a key part of the campaign and the persona the campaign was selling, it was also a central theme of the convention.[29]  On the last night of the convention July 29, 2004, Kerry delivered his address accepting the Democratic Presidential Nomination. Keeping to the military theme Kerry commenced his speech and accepted the nomination by stating; “I’m John Kerry and I’m reporting for duty.” The key quote of his acceptance speech was “the future doesn’t belong to fear, it belongs to freedom.”[30] The convention failed to give Kerry that usual post-convention “bounce” in polls; instead, he fell behind Bush after a slight lead heading into the convention.[31]

 

In August 250 Swift Boat veterans formed the 527 group, Swift Vets and POWs for Truth and they launched their attack on Kerry’s military service and discharge. The group conducted a full media assault that also included a best-selling book “Unfit for Command”[32] and television commercials, but the movement gained the most momentum through the internet.[33] The group claimed that “Kerry’s phony war crimes charges, his exaggerated claims about his own service in Vietnam, and his deliberate misrepresentation of the nature and effectiveness of Swift boat operations compel us to step forward.”[34] The organization used their ads to question both Kerry’s record as a Vietnam War hero and ability to be the “commander-in-chief,” and subsequently attacked Kerry’s Congressional hearing testimony on the Vietnam War. The Kerry campaign was unsure how to respond and never directly attacked the allegations. Instead elements were attacked including the group’s funding from Republicans related to the Bush campaign, and some targeted accusations on Kerry’s record. In the end, Kerry mostly discontinued mentioning his war record that was previously a major selling point.[35]

 

Kerry won or tied in all three presidential debates, but in the end, it did not help him enough to win the election. The first debate was held on September 30 at University of Miami, was moderated by Jim Lehrer of PBS and focused on foreign policy.[36] Kerry was the apparent winner, Bush’s demeanor and facial expression lost him the debate, he spent most the time expressing his annoyance, sighing and scowling. Bush also seemed tired after spending the day visiting hurricane victims, whereas Kerry rested for the big debate.[37] The second debate was held October 8 at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri and was moderated by Charles Gibson of ABC News.[38] At the town meeting styled debate, the candidates answered questions on both domestic and foreign policy. Bush attempted to make light of the “scowling” criticism, but still appeared angry in comparison to Kerry, and it appeared again as if Kerry won or at least it was a draw.[39] The third and last debate was on October 13 at Arizona State University was moderated by Bob Schieffer of CBS News, and focused on domestic policy and the economy.[40] The debate was considered a draw, mostly because of the controversy Kerry caused when responding to a question on gay rights, purposely pointing out that Vice President Dick Cheney’s daughter Mary Cheney was a lesbian. What made the comment even more of a campaign issue was Kerry’s campaign manager Cahill and Edwards backed up Kerry.[41]

 

Kerry received a boost in his poll numbers from the debates, because in all three he appeared more presidential, but he still trailed Bush.[42] The poll bump, however, did not last long; the campaign’s October Surprise made an appearance on October 29 in the form of a new Osama Bin Laden tape threatening the United States and aired by the Al-Jazeera news channel. In the eighteen-minute tape Biden both takes responsibility for the September 11 terror attacks and condemns the Bush administration’s response.[43] The tape turned the tide of the campaign in Bush’s favor, in the first poll after the tape’s release; Bush had a 6-point advantage over Kerry that did not let up as the election approached. Election Day was four days later on November 2, 2004 resulting in Republicans George W. Bush was reelected president and Richard B. Cheney was reelected vice president with 286 Electoral College votes to Kerry and Edwards 251 Electoral College votes.[44]

 

SOURCES:

 

Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Sen. John F. Kerry, D-MA.” George Washington University, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/kerry.html

 

Bossie, David N.. The many faces of John Kerry: why this Massachusetts liberal is wrong for America. Nashville: WND Books, 2003.

 

George W. Bush: “Presidential Debate in Coral Gables, Florida,” September 30, 2004. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=72770

 

George W. Bush: “Presidential Debate in St. Louis, Missouri,” October 8, 2004. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=72776

 

George W. Bush: “Presidential Debate in Tempe, Arizona,” October 13, 2004. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=63163.

 

Ceaser, James W., and Andrew Busch. Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005.

 

CNN Reporters, “The Debates,” CNN, America Votes 2004, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/special/president/debates/

 

Denton, Robert E. Jr. The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publisher, 2005.

 

Fournier, Ron. “Big Wins for Kerry, Edwards Out,” March 2, 2004, ABC News. http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=123501 (Accessed May 20, 2014)

 

Kerry, John F. “Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Boston,” July 29, 2004. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25971

 

Leip, David. “2004 Presidential Democratic Primary Election Results.”  US Election Atlas.

http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/national.php?f=0&year=2004&elect=1

 

Federal Elections Commission Electoral and Popular Vote Summary

http://www.fec.gov/pubrec/fe2004/tables.pdf (Accessed, April 24, 2014)

 

“Bin Laden: Al Qaeda motivated to strike U.S. again.” October 30, 2004. CNN. http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/10/29/binladen.tape/index.html (Accessed, May 24, 2014)

 

O’Neill, John E., and Jerome R. Corsi. Unfit for command: swift boat veterans speak out against John Kerry. Washington, DC: Regnery Pub, 2004

 

Troy, Gil, Arthur M. Schlesinger, and Fred L. Israel, eds. 2012. “2004 Overview” History of American presidential elections, 1789-2008. New York: Facts On File. https://presidentialcampaignselectionsreference.wordpress.com/overviews/21st-century/2004-overview/  (Accessed, April 24, 2014)

 

Wikipedia contributors, “2004 Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Democratic_National_Convention (Accessed May 6, 2014).

 

Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

 

Wikipedia contributors, “Swift Vets and POWs for Truth,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swift_Vets_and_POWs_for_Truth

 

[1] David N. Bossie, The many faces of John Kerry: why this Massachusetts liberal is wrong for America. Nashville: WND Books, 2003, p. 262.

[2] Eric M. Appleman/Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Sen. John F. Kerry, D-MA.” George Washington University, (Accessed, May 15, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/kerry.html

[3] James W.Ceaser and Andrew Busch.. Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005. p. 71.

[4] Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

Ceaser and Busch. Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 70.

[5] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 97.

[6] Ibid., p. 99.

[7] Ibid., p. 97.

[8] Ibid., p. 100.

[9] Ibid., p. 97.

[10] Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

[11] Ibid.

[12] Ceaser and Busch. Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 71.

[13] Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

[14] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 99.

[15] Gil Troy, Arthur M. Schlesinger, and Fred L. Israel, eds., “2004 Overview” History of American presidential elections, 1789-2008. New York: Facts On File, 2012, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), https://presidentialcampaignselectionsreference.wordpress.com/overviews/21st-century/2004-overview/

[16] Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

[17] Gil Troy, Arthur M. Schlesinger, and Fred L. Israel, eds., “2004 Overview” History of American presidential elections, 1789-2008. New York: Facts On File, 2012, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), https://presidentialcampaignselectionsreference.wordpress.com/overviews/21st-century/2004-overview/

[18] Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

[19]Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 97.

[20] David M. Halbfinger, “THE 2004 CAMPAIGN: THE MASSACHUSETTS SENATOR; From a Tuesday in March, Kerry Looks to November,” March 3, 2004, (Accessed May 25, 2014), http://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/03/us/2004-campaign-massachusetts-senator-tuesday-march-kerry-looks-november.html

[21] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 107.

[22] Ibid., p. 128.

[23] “Kerry discusses $87 billion comment,” CNN, September 30, 2004, (Accessed May 8, 2004), http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/09/30/kerry.comment/

[24] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 109.

[25] Ron Fournier, “Big Wins for Kerry, Edwards Out,” ABC News, March 2, 2004, (Accessed May 20, 2014), http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=123501

[26] Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

[27] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 110.

[28] Wikipedia contributors, “2004 Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Democratic_National_Convention (Accessed May 6, 2014).

[29] Robert E. Denton, Jr. The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective. (Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005), p. 31.

[30] John F. Kerry, “Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Boston,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, July 29, 2004 (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25971

[31] Wikipedia contributors, “2004 Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Democratic_National_Convention (accessed May 6, 2014).

“No Convention Bounce For Kerry,” CBS News, February 11, 2009, (Accessed May 25, 2014), http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/08/02/politics/main633561.shtml

Susan Page, “So why did Bush, not Kerry, get the bounce?”. USAToday.Com, August 3, 2004, (Accessed May 25, 2014), http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/president/2004-08-02-poll-cover_x.htm

[32] John E. O’Neill, and Jerome R. Corsi, Unfit for command: swift boat veterans speak out against John Kerry. Washington, DC: Regnery Pub., 2004

[33] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 119.

[34] Wikipedia contributors, “Swift Vets and POWs for Truth,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swift_Vets_and_POWs_for_Truth

[35] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 120.

[36] George W. Bush: “Presidential Debate in Coral Gables, Florida,” September 30, 2004. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=72770 (Accessed, April 24, 2014)

[37] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 128.

[38] George W. Bush: “Presidential Debate in St. Louis, Missouri,” October 8, 2004. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=72776. (Accessed, April 24, 2014)

[39] Wikipedia contributors, “United States presidential election, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed April 26, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election,_2004

[40] George W. Bush: “Presidential Debate in Tempe, Arizona,” October 13, 2004. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=63163

[41] Ceaser and Busch, Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics, 2005, p. 131.

[42] Ibid., p. 132.

[43] “Bin Laden: Al Qaeda motivated to strike U.S. again,” October 30, 2004, CNN, (Accessed May 24, 2014), http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/10/29/binladen.tape/index.html

[44] Federal Elections Commission Electoral and Popular Vote Summary, (Accessed, April 24, 2014)

http://www.fec.gov/pubrec/fe2004/tables.pdf

 

2004: Democratic National Convention

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

AMERICAN HISTORY REFERENCE

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

2004 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION

The 2004 Democratic National Convention convened from July 26-29 at the Fleet Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico served as the chairman. The convention nominated Senator John Forbes Kerry (Massachusetts) for president on the first ballot, and Senator John Edwards (North Carolina) by acclamation for vice president. The venue for the convention was chosen all away back in 2002, but the fact that is was being held in the candidate home state, a state known for its liberalism was an attack point incumbent Republican George W. Bush’s campaign emphasized for their advantage. The major television networks, ABC, CBS and NBC decided in 2004 to only broadcast an hour of the convention each night from 10-11pm, so the official televised transmission of the conventions was condensed into only three hours. Cable News including CNN and Fox News took over full coverage of every aspect of the conventions three-day schedules.[1]
Kerry led slightly in the polls prior to the convention according to the CNN/USA Today/Gallup Poll 49 percent to Bush’s 48 percent, but he was trailing relating to “leadership qualities” 54 percent to 37 percent. The view of Kerry as a flip-flopper was also affecting his polling regarding “does not change his positions on issues for political reasons” 52 percent to 30 percent.[2] The convention was meant to bolster Kerry’s leadership image. Polling also indicated that Kerry was viewed as a liberal where a majority of Americans did not identify with liberal issues. Instead the campaign and convention aimed at appealing to moderates and independent voters, many of which viewed the economy as an important issue. Therefore, the convention focused on the economy and limited direct attacks on Bush and addressing distinctly liberal issues.[3]

 

The convention focused on the major issues of terrorism and the war in Iraq, health care, taxes, and economic revival. Since Kerry’s military service was a key part of the campaign and the persona the campaign was selling, it was also a central theme of the convention. The campaign issued a brief statement that summarized the message and themes of the campaign; “A strong team with the right plan for America. John Kerry is a dedicated combat veteran. John Edwards has spent his life standing up against powerful interests. Together, they will make health care affordable and accessible for all Americans, create and keep jobs In America, make us independent from Mideast oil, and restore America’s respect in the world.”[4] Each night of the campaign was designated a particular theme.

 

The Democratic Party platform was entitled “Strong at Home, Respected in the World,” and it was divided into four sections. Part one was a “A Strong, Respected America” on the War on Terrorism, energy independence, military strengthening and homeland security. Part two was “A Strong, Growing Economy” on helping the middle class and job creation. Part three “Strong, Healthy Families” on health care, education and the environmental policy. Finally part four was “A Strong American Community” on civil rights.[5]

 

Opening night, Monday, July 26, 2004 the theme was “The Kerry-Edwards Plan for America’s Future.” The line-up featured Democratic presidents and leaders of the past including Former President Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, Former Vice President Al Gore and Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton who introduced her husband former President Clinton addressed the convention. Carter, Clinton and Gore mostly attacked Bush record on domestic and foreign policy in their remarks and seemed like a continuous comparison of Democratic and Republican approaches to leadership.[6]

 

On Tuesday, July 27, 2004 the theme was “A Lifetime of Strength and Service” focusing on Kerry’s biography, character and party unity featuring leaders in the Democratic Party and former 2004 presidential candidates. Massachusetts Senator Edward (Ted) Kennedy spoke about hallmark Democratic domestic issues. Former Governor Howard Dean, Rep. Richard Gephardt, Senator Carol Moseley Braun and Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle all endorsed Kerry in their speeches, putting the divisive campaign behind them. Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano and the wife of Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack, Christie Vilsack both spoke about “jobs, education and health care.” Ron Reagan, the son of former President Ronald Reagan, who died from complication of Alzheimer’s also spoke primarily advocating need to increase funding for stem cell research. Reagan was supposed to show cross-over appeal, but his speech was at odds with the rest of the evening’s topics. [7] Kerry’s wife Teresa Heinz Kerry also addressed the convention providing the leading Kerry biographical element of the evening, however, she spoke more about herself, than humanize her husband, who needed to show a more personal side to his image to appeal to voters.[8]

 

Senator Richard Durbin introduced the up and coming Democratic star, Illinois state senator Barack Obama who delivered the keynote speech. Kerry chose Illinois state senator Barack Obama, who was that year’s Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate seat from Illinois to deliver the keynote address. Obama’s speech focused on unity across political parties and ideology, aimed at the independents and moderate voters the Democrats were trying to appeal to.[9] Obama spoke of his personal background as an African American, with a white mother from Kansas and a black father from Kenya, and recounted his atypical biography, saying; “In no other country on Earth is my story even possible.” [10]

 

Obama gave examples and juxtapositions as to what bridges the divide; “there’s not a liberal America and a conservative America; there’s the United States of America. There’s not a black America and white America and Latino America and Asian America; there’s the United States of America…We are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the stars and stripes, all of us defending the United States of America.” [11] Obama’s keynote address was not broadcast on the major television networks because it was scheduled before 10 PM; the address however, was televised on the specialized news stations including CNN. Obama became a star based on the new reports and video of speech posted on the web.

 

On Wednesday, July 28 the theme was “A Stronger More Secure America” emphasizing the campaign’s position regarding national security and the War on Terror. The evening continued the string of former 2004 presidential candidates, who endorsed Kerry, including; Sen. Bob Graham, U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich, and Rev. Al Sharpton. The main event of the evening was Edward’s address accepting the nomination for vice president. Edward’s daughter Cate introduced her mother Elizabeth Edwards, who formally introduced the vice presidential nominee.[12]

 

Edwards delivered his “Two Americas” speech formally accepting the vice presidential nomination also focusing on bridging the divide within the country. Edwards emphasized that the Kerry-Edwards campaign has the solutions to the problems that divide the country both at home and abroad promising that “Hope is on the way.” The speech formally entitled “Build One America” was divided in four sections; domestic policy and the economy, foreign policy and the War in Iraq, “restoring America’s credibility in the world”; the last part focused on personal examples and anecdotes, [13] concluding; “Let’s make America stronger at home and more respected in the world. Let’s ensure that once again, in our one America — our one America — tomorrow will always be better than today.”[14]

 

Right after Edward’s speech the formal roll call to nominate Kerry as the Democratic presidential nominee began. Prior to the convention all the other nominees released their delegates, except for some of Dennis Kucinich’s, some of his delegates voted for Kucinich, and others who were prevented from doing so, instead abstained from voting rather than vote for Kerry. Therefore Kerry received the nomination on the first ballot, but not by acclamation. The results were as follows; John Kerry: 4,253 votes 98.40%; Dennis Kucinich: 43 votes; 0.99%; Abstentions: 26 votes, 0.60%, totaling 4,322 votes 100.00%. Vice President John Edwards however, was chosen by acclamation.[15]

 

The last night of the convention July 29, 2004 the theme was “Stronger at Home, Respected in the World” summing up the campaign’s domestic and foreign policy positions. The evening’s speakers were meant to introduce Kerry to the American electorate; among the speakers of the evening including, introductions by Kerry’s stepsons Christopher and Andre Heinz, and Kerry’s daughters Alexandra and Vanessa. Throughout the campaign there was a difficulty in humanizing Kerry, but his daughters recounting their personal anecdotes of their father were able to accomplish what nobody could before, even his wife.[16]

 

The Kerry children’s introductions were followed by a campaign biographical video, narrated by actor Morgan Freedman. The video emphasized his early life, and military experience, but rushed over his time in the Senate. It included an interview with Kerry and his wife and concluded that; “Time and again, John Kerry has been there for our nation, a soldier who understands the importance of peace, a leader who knows how to listen, a father dedicated to the children of our nation, a man devoted to our country’s remarkable promise.”[17]

 

Kerry’s crewmates from Vietnam were the next to give tribute to the nominee leading up to his speech, including Jim Rassmann, who Kerry saved in Vietnam and delivered a statement of praise to Kerry and introduced former Georgia Senator and veteran Max Cleland who was to formally introduce Kerry and gave the nominating speech. Cleland concluded his speech in praise; “Tonight, I am honored to introduce to you another son of liberty, a brother in arms, a man called by destiny at this fateful hour in our nation’s history. He is my brother. He is my friend. He is my hero. Ladies and gentleman, tonight, John Kerry is able to answer this nation’s call.” Cleland’s speech was not televised except for the last few minutes on ABC.[18]

 

Most of the network coverage for the evening started with Kerry’s entrance accompanied by Bruce Springsteen’s “No Surrender.”[19] Keeping to the military theme Kerry commenced his speech and accepted the nomination by stating; “I’m John Kerry and I’m reporting for duty.” Kerry introduced the theme of the night and his speech declaring; “My fellow Americans, we are here tonight united in one simple purpose: to make America stronger at home and respected in the world.” Kerry’s speech was divided by three parts, his background, foreign policy and national security and domestic policy and economic opportunity.  Although the campaign intended to focus on appealing to moderates and independents Kerry attacked the Bush Administration, stating “My first pledge to you tonight: As president, I will restore trust and credibility to the White House,” followed by policy contrasts.[20]

 

Kerry tried to portray himself as tough on national security and defense issues, but differentiate the threshold level to going to war, he outlined how he would deal with national security, the military and the War on Terrorism, still he promised; “I will never hesitate to use force when it is required.” Kerry concluded this section with the key quote of his acceptance speech “the future doesn’t belong to fear, it belongs to freedom.”[21]

 

Moving towards domestic policy Kerry again differentiated the Bush Administration policies with what his ticket would do, explain that it would be “Not narrow values that divide us, but shared values that unite us…That is the American dream and the American value.” Kerry outlined his plans for the economy, job creation, cutting taxes, health care and energy policy, by intertwining stories from Americans, and the same time using the refrain Edwards used in his speech the night before, stating; “America can do better. And help is on the way.”[22]

 

In the last part of his speech Kerry called for a unified and respectful general election campaign.  Kerry used similar rhetoric as Obama did his keynote address, pointing out “Maybe some just see us divided into red states and blue states, but I see us as one America red, white, and blue.” Kerry also invited people of faith to support his ticket, a voting bloc that is traditionally Republican. Kerry promised his administration would be unifying and that faith is not exclusive to only one party, expressing “These aren’t Democratic values. These aren’t Republican values. They’re American values.”

 

Kerry ended his speech with some historical “What if[s]?”, and continued about future possibilities, concluding; “It is time to reach for the next dream. It is time to look to the next horizon. For America, the hope is there. The sun is rising. Our best days are still to come.”[23] With those words the convention ended with Kerry joined by his wife, Theresa, and John Edwards and his wife Elizabeth on the stage followed by their families in the traditional end of convention victory celebration. The convention’s aim at appealing to moderates and independents prevented the Democrats from attacking their Republican opponents and presenting a clearly defined Democratic and liberal message. The strategy did not work, as the Kerry-Edwards ticket failed to benefit from the usual post-convention “bounce” in the polls,[24] in fact after the convention Kerry-Edwards saw a dip in the polls, according to the USA TODAY/CNN/Gallup poll Kerry-Edwards had 47 percent support to the Bush-Cheney campaign’s 48 percent.[25]

 

Sources:

 

Ceaser, James W. and Andrew Busch. Red over blue: the 2004 elections and American politics. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005.

 

CNN Reporters, “Democratic Nation Convention Daily Schedule,” “Monday, July 26, Tuesday, July 27, Wednesday, July 28, Thursday, July 29,” CNN, America Votes 2004 http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/special/president/convention/dnc/schedules/monday.html

http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/special/president/convention/dnc/schedules/tuesday.html

http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/special/president/convention/dnc/schedules/wednesday.html

http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/special/president/convention/dnc/schedules/thursday.html (Accessed April 26, 2014)

 

 

Denton, Robert E. Jr. The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005.

 

John F. Kerry, “Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Boston,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, July 29, 2004 (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25971

 

Newport, Frank. “Kerry’s Speech Thursday’s address could be key to election.” Gallup News Service. July 29, 2004, (Accessed April 26, 2014) http://www.gallup.com/poll/12547/kerrys-speech.aspx

 

Obama, Barack. “Transcript: Illinois Senate Candidate Barack Obama.” The Washington Post, July 27, 2004, (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19751-2004Jul27.html

 

Wikipedia contributors, “2004 Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Democratic_National_Convention

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Robert E. Denton, Jr. The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective. (Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005), p. 30.

[2] Frank Newport. “Kerry’s Speech Thursday’s address could be key to election.”

Gallup News Service, July 29, 2004. (Accessed April 26, 2014) http://www.gallup.com/poll/12547/kerrys-speech.aspx; Denton, p. 30.

[3] Ibid., p. 30-31.

[4] Ibid., p. 31.

[5] Wikipedia contributors, “2004 Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Democratic_National_Convention (Accessed May 6, 2014).

[6] Denton, The 2004 Presidential Campaign, 2005, p. 38.

[7] Ibid., p. 38.

[8] Ibid., p. 42.

[9] Ibid., p. 38.

[10] Barack Obama. “Transcript: Illinois Senate Candidate Barack Obama.” The Washington Post, July 27, 2004. (Accessed May 6, 2014) http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19751-2004Jul27.html

[11] Ibid.

[12] Denton, The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective, 2005, p. 42.

[13] Denton. The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective, 2005, p. 44.

[14] “Text: Sen. John Edwards Speech to DNC.” The Washington Post, July 28, 2004. (Accessed May 6, 2014) http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A22230-2004Jul28.html

[15] Wikipedia contributors, “2004 Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed May 6, 2014). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Democratic_National_Convention

[16] Denton, The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective, 2005, p. 45.

[17] Ibid., p. 45-46.

[18] Ibid., p. 46.

[19] Ibid., p. 46.

[20] John F. Kerry, “Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Boston,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, July 29, 2004 (Accessed May 6, 2014), http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25971

[21] Ibid.

[22] Ibid.

[23] Ibid.

[24] Denton, The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective, 2005, p. 49.

[25] Wikipedia contributors, “2004 Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_Democratic_National_Convention (accessed May 6, 2014).

“No Convention Bounce For Kerry,” CBS News, February 11, 2009, (Accessed May 25, 2014), http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/08/02/politics/main633561.shtml

Susan Page, “So why did Bush, not Kerry, get the bounce?”. USAToday.Com, August 3, 2004, (Accessed May 25, 2014), http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/nation/president/2004-08-02-poll-cover_x.htm

 

2004: Ralph Nader

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

AMERICAN HISTORY REFERENCE

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

2004 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN: RALPH NADER

Ralph Nader, an activist, writer and lawyer made his fourth run for the presidency in the 2004 campaign. He has in total run five times for the presidency before retiring. Previously Nader ran as a write-in candidate in the 1992 New Hampshire primary, and then the Green Party’s candidate in 1996 and 2000, his last campaign was in 2008 as an independent. In 1996, Nader received less than 1 percent of the vote, but in 2000, he received nearly 3 percent and 97,421 votes.

 

Nader was born in Winsted, Connecticut in 1934 to Greek Orthodox Christian parents originally from Lebanon. Nader graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University in 1955, continuing for a law degree at Harvard Law School where he graduated in 1958. Prior to his presidential campaigns, Nader was known most of all for his “automobile safety activism.” A passion that began as a law student and culminated in a book Unsafe at Any Speed published in 1965 arguing the auto industry did not make cars safe for consumers, which resulted in government action, and enacting of safety measures. Afterwards Nader continued his consumer protection activism and created numerous non-profit organizations.[1]

 

In the 2000 presidential campaign, he served as a spoiler to Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore, because Republican George W. Bush won over Gore with only 537 votes, Democrats believed Nader’s over 91,000 votes could have altered the elections results. Nader explained in his book Crashing the Party that “In the year 2000, exit polls reported that 25% of my voters would have voted for Bush, 38% would have voted for Gore and the rest would not have voted at all.”[2]

 

Nader’s impact in 2004 was less noteworthy; third parties candidates’ impact in the 2004 presidential campaign was minimal at best including Nader’s campaign. Robert E. Denton, Jr. explained in his book The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective that “Democrats united behind [John] Kerry, and Ralph Nader’s campaign never became a significant factor.[3] The only significant issue about his campaign was his fight to have his name on the ballot.

 

Nader’s first action in the 2004 campaign was “a 27-point “Spirit of the Common Good” agenda” which he submitted on October, 30, 2003 to the Democratic and Republican Party looking for their reactions. Nader then launched “a presidential exploratory committee and a website.”[4] Nader decided in 2004 he would not run as a Green Party candidate and made that announcement on December 24, 2003. Nader on February 22, 2004 announced his candidacy on NBC saying; “There’s too much power and wealth in too few hands.”[5] Nader also cited the “lack of substantive response from both the DNC and the RNC to important subjects and necessities facing Americans.”[6]

 

Democratic nominee John Kerry met with Nader on May 19, 2004 for over an hour, hoping to convince him to support his campaign and not continue his run that year, even though he did not explicitly ask Nader to run nor did they discuss the War in Iraq.[7] Nader particularly wanted “corporate welfare, corporate crime,” and “labor reform” to figure prominently in Kerry’s campaign, two issues important to Republicans and one that could be used against Bush.[8]

 

Nader faced opposition from former supporters and the Democratic Party, who found preventing Bush’s re-election more important than Nader’s campaign, they were concerned Nader would only spoil Kerry’s campaign. Former members of the “Nader 2000 Citizens Committee” created “Greens for Kerry,” and they issued a letter on September 14 calling for Nader supporters and Green Party members to “support for Kerry/Edwards in all swing states,” stating that “removing George W. Bush from office should be the top priority in the 2004 presidential election.” Even Nader’s former running mate Winona LaDuke endorsed Kerry on October 13, 2004.[9]

 

Although, he did not want to run for the Green Party ticket Nader hoped they would still nominate him at their convention. To appeal to the party Nader announced on June 21 that his Vice Presidential running mate would be Peter Miguel Camejo Guanche, a political activist of “Venezuelan descent,” who primarily associated himself with Socialist Workers Party earlier in his life and later on with the Green Party.[10] The Green Party shunned Nader and chose David Cobb as their nominee however, on May 12, the Reform Party endorsed Nader’s ticket.[11]

 

Democrats tried to convince Nader drop out if the race including Chairman of the Democratic National Committee Terry McAuliffe, who publicly stated that if Nader continued his campaign making sure Bush was voted in for a second term would tarnish his career and legacy.[12] Nader fought back stating; “Voting for a candidate of one’s choice is a Constitutional right, and the Democrats who are asking me not to run are, without question, seeking to deny the Constitutional rights of voters who are, by law, otherwise free to choose to vote for me.”[13][14]

 

Nader’s campaign manager Theresa Amato, later revealed that McAuliffe also try to pay-off Nader into not campaigning in battleground states to help Kerry’s campaign, which Nader also refused.[15] In 2009 Nader recounted; “Terry McAuliffe is slipperier than an eel in olive oil.”[16] Supposedly, money that Nader did not refuse was donations, United Progressives for Victory revealed on October 26 that Nader received money particularly from wealthy Republican and Bush supporters and the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth, who wanted Nader to serve as a spoiler to Kerry’s campaign.[17] Despite urgings from Democrats, including McAuliffe and his running mate Camejo, Nader did not return any donations no matter the origins or reasons behind them.[18]

 

In an interview with ABC News’ Good Morning America, Nader admitted that he hoped his campaign in 2004 would achieve the same spoiler status as in 2000; “We’re trying to get as many votes as possible, which means we’re going into states that are characterized as safe states, battleground states and states that fall in between.”[19]  Nader focused on making personal campaign appearances only in battleground states. Not only did Nader want to be a spoiler for the two major party candidates, he stated that his “long-range goal is to break up the two parties,” Nader called the two-party system “a menace and subversion of our democratic processes and it’s basically sold our elections and our government to commercial interests.”[20]

 

Nader expressed the main issues of his campaign were “political reform, economic reform, getting out of Iraq, a living wage for families.” Ending the War in Iraq was the most important issue to Nader, and he considered both President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney as war criminals for starting the war.[21]

 

Although he personally was running as an independent, Nader appeared in certain states as the candidate for smaller third parties, including the Reform Party USA, Independent Party of Delaware, Independence Party, and the Peace and Justice Party. To simply access to having his name on the ballot, Nader created a new party, the Populist Party, using the same name of an earlier political party from the 1890s. [22]

 

Nader’s fight to be on the ballot consumed his campaign; he found it difficult to get enough signatures on the official petition to be placed on the ballot, his volunteers and workers were harassed, and many signatures were “disputed.” Nader blamed the Democrats for making all the difficulties, “legal challenges,” and preventing his name on the ballot, especially in battleground states. Nader called what the Democrats were doing “dirty tricks designed to deny millions of voters the opportunity to choose who should be the next president.”[23] Nader had legal fights in some states that had appeals through the court system up to the Supreme Court. [24] Nader was mounting legal battles in 21 states by September and fought until the election. The Supreme Court denied him access to the ballot in Ohio and in Oregon where the decision came after the election.

 

Nader spent a total of $4,566,037 for his campaign and legal fights to get his name put on the ballot,[25] while he raised only $3,390,009.32.[26] Nader was on the ballot in 34 states and left off in eight including, “California, Georgia, Indiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Virginia.”[27] In the states where his ticket was off the ballot, they still allowed Nader to be included as a write-in vote. His running mate Camejo was replaced on the ballot in four states; in Alabama, New York, and Ohio by Jan D. Pierce and in Montana with Karen Sanchirico. In the end, Nader received 463,655 votes, and only 0.38 percent.[28] Nader’s showing in 2004 was the worst of his five attempts at the presidency.

 

 

Sources:

 

ABC News Reporter, “2004 Vote Profile: Ralph Nader,” ABC News, January 6, 2006 (Accessed September 16, 2014) http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=178532&page=1&singlePage=true

 

Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

 

An Unreasonable Man, 2006, http://www.anunreasonableman.com/

 

Burden, Barry C. “A Tale of Two Campaigns: Ralph Nader’s Strategy in the 2004 Presidential Election,” PS: Political Science and Politics, Vol. 39, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 871-874.

 

CNN Reporters, “Kerry, Nader focus on common ground in meeting,” CNN, May 19, 2004 (Accessed September 18, 2014) http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/05/19/nader.kerry/

 

Denton, Robert E. Jr. The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005.

 

Kumar, Anita and Rosalind S. Helderman, “Nader: McAuliffe Offered Money To Avoid Key States in ’04 Race”. The Washington Post, May 9, 2009, (Accessed September 16, 2014) http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/28/AR2009052803823.html
Marinucci, Carla. “Nader defends GOP Cash,” San Francisco Chronicle, July 10, 2004 (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://www.sfgate.com/politics/article/Nader-defends-GOP-cash-Candidate-says-he-s-2742925.php

 

Leip, David. “2004 Presidential Democratic Primary Election Results.”  US Election Atlas.

http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/national.php?f=0&year=2004&elect=1

 

Troy, Gil, Arthur M. Schlesinger, and Fred L. Israel, eds. 2012. “2004 Overview” History of American presidential elections, 1789-2008. New York: Facts On File. https://presidentialcampaignselectionsreference.wordpress.com/overviews/21st-century/2004-overview/  (Accessed, April 24, 2014)

 

Wikipedia contributors, “Peter Camejo,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Camejo

 

Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader presidential campaign, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014),  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader_presidential_campaign,_2004

 

Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader

 

 

[1] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader

[2] Ibid.

[3] Robert E. Denton, Jr. The 2004 Presidential Campaign: A Communication Perspective. (Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005), p. 143.

[4] Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

[5] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader

[6] Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

[7] Ibid.

[8] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader

[9] Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

[10] Wikipedia contributors, “Peter Camejo,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Camejo

[11] Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

[12] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader

[13] Ibid.

[14] An Unreasonable Man, 2006, http://www.anunreasonableman.com/

[15] Anita Kumar and Rosalind S. Helderman, “Nader: McAuliffe Offered Money To Avoid Key States in ’04 Race”. The Washington Post, May 9, 2009, (Accessed September 16, 2014) http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/28/AR2009052803823.html

[16] Ibid.

[17] Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

[18] Carla Marinucci, “Nader defends GOP Cash,” San Francisco Chronicle, July 10, 2004 (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://www.sfgate.com/politics/article/Nader-defends-GOP-cash-Candidate-says-he-s-2742925.php

[19] ABC News Reporter, “2004 Vote Profile: Ralph Nader,” ABC News, January 6, 2006 (Accessed September 16, 2014) http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=178532&page=1&singlePage=true

[20] Ibid.

[21] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader

[22] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader presidential campaign, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014),  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader_presidential_campaign,_2004

[23] Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

[24] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader presidential campaign, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014),  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader_presidential_campaign,_2004

[25] Gil Troy, Arthur M. Schlesinger, and Fred L. Israel, eds., “2004 Overview” History of American presidential elections, 1789-2008. New York: Facts On File, 2012, (Accessed, April 24, 2014), https://presidentialcampaignselectionsreference.wordpress.com/overviews/21st-century/2004-overview/

[26] Appleman, Eric M. /Democracy in Action. 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004. “Ralph Nader-2004 Independent Candidate” George Washington University, (Accessed, September 16, 2014), http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2004/nader.html

[27] Wikipedia contributors, “Ralph Nader presidential campaign, 2004,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, (Accessed September 16, 2014),  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Nader_presidential_campaign,_2004

[28] David Leip. “2004 Presidential Democratic Primary Election Results,” US Election Atlas,

http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/national.php?f=0&year=2004&elect=1

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