21st Century

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN & ELECTIONS

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

CHRONOLOGIES: 21ST CENTURY

2000

 

  • May 27, 1997: The Supreme Court rules Paula Jones can continue pursue her sexual lawsuit against Clinton, even though he is a sitting president.  (“In a decision affecting both the scope of presidential power and the immediate future of the Clinton presidency, the Supreme Court rules that Paula Jones can pursue her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Clinton, even while he is in office.”)
  • August 5, 1997: Clinton signs a law that would balance the budget by 2002. (“President Clinton signs legislation providing for a balanced budget by 2002, ending years of partisan wrangling between Clinton and Republican leaders.”)
  • October 3, 1997: Attorney General Janet Reno announces to Congress in a letter that the Justice department has concluded that the Clinton reelection campaign did not violate campaign finance laws in the 1996 campaign. (“Attorney General Janet Reno, in a letter to Congress, announces that the Justice Department’s investigation into allegations that the Clinton administration violated campaign finance laws, especially in its efforts to finance the 1996 presidential campaign, has uncovered no major violations.”)
  • January 20, 1998: News sources break major story that the President had a “sexual relationship” with Monica Lewinsky a former White House intern. (“News breaks that President Clinton may have had a sexual relationship with a former White House intern named Monica Lewinsky. Clinton, adamantly denying the allegations, states, “I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky.””)
  • April 2, 1998: “A judge dismisses Paula Jones’s sexual harassment lawsuit against President Clinton.”
  • August 7, 1998: (“Terrorists bomb American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, killing 224 people, including 20 Americans. United States intelligence believes that Osama bin Laden, a Saudi exile and alleged terrorist leader, is behind the attacks.”)
  • August 20, 1998: In retaliation, President Clinton orders the military to commence air strikes at terrorist targets in Afghanistan and the Sudan. (“The U.S. military, on orders from President Clinton, launch reprisal strikes on “terrorist related facilities” in Afghanistan, bin Laden’s country of residence, and Sudan. The attacks on Sudan, however, come under particular scrutiny, as a number of international observers and members of the Sudanese government contend that the United States destroyed a civilian pharmaceutical facility, and not a chemical weapons plant, as the Clinton administration reported.”)
  • September 11, 1998: The Starr Report is released by the Office of the Independent Counsel with Kenneth Starr’s findings on the Clinton-Lewinsky affair. (“The Office of the Independent Counsel releases its report on the Clinton-Lewinsky affair, commonly known as the Starr Report. Two days earlier, Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr tells the House that he has uncovered information that may be grounds for impeachment.”)
  • December 12, 1998: Nebraska Senator Bob Kerrey withdraws from the Presidential race.
  • December 16, 1998: “President Clinton orders a three-day bombing attack against Iraq after Saddam Hussein refuses to cooperate with United Nations weapons inspectors.”
  • December 19, 1998: “The House of Representatives votes to impeach President Clinton on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice.”
  • February 12, 1999: “The Senate acquits President Clinton on both articles of impeachment, rejecting one article and splitting evenly on the second.”
  • Summer 1999: Newsweek poll, Bush 46%, Gore 38%, and Buchanan 8%
  • June 12, 1999: “Gov. George W. Bush of Texas ends his shadow Presidential campaign and flies to Iowa to announce his intention to run for President. His announcement effectively inaugurated what is shaping up to be the earliest and quickest Presidential nomination processes in recent American history. He left Austin, Tex., for his first explicit campaign trip; three days in Iowa and New Hampshire.” (NYT) George Bush raises $36 million, prompts moderate many Republicans hopefuls to withdraw
  • June 16, 1999: In Carthage, Tennessee Vice President Al Gore announces his intent to run for the Presidency, pledging to ”bring a new wave of fundamental change to this nation.”
  • June 30, 1999: Prohibition Party Convention nominates Earl F. Dodge Jr.
  • September 6, 1999: The 3rd Constitution Party National Convention convenes in the Regal Riverfront Hotel in St. Louis Missouri and nominates Howard Phillips for President and Joe Sobran for Vice President. Formerly the U.S. Taxpayers Party; the party changes their name at the convention.
  • September 26, 1999: Pat Buchanan publishes a book “A Republic, Not an Empire” were he agrees with some of Hitler’s policies and argues that Germany was not a threat to the United States in 1940, and that the Western World in fact commenced the war in attempt to help Poland. Buchanan defends his book claims it is not pro-Hitler.
  • September 27, 1999: Senator John McCain of Arizona declares his candidacy for the Republican Presidential nomination in Nashua, New Hampshire. John McCain runs as a crusading insurgent based on campaign finance reform and honesty.
  • September 27, 1999: Dan Quayle withdraws from the Republican Presidential nomination race.
  • September 1999: McCain attacks Buchanan’s position and suggest that Buchanan leave the Republican Party. He does and instead he pursues the Reform Party Presidential nomination.
  • October 1999: Buchanan announces he is leaving the Republican Party to pursue the Reform Party nomination and calls the Republican and Democratic Parties a  “beltway party.”
  • October 16, 1999: Socialist Party Convention nominates David McReynolds for President.
  • October 22, 1999: Republican Candidates Forum in Durham, New Hampshire
  • December 6, 1999: Republican Candidates Debate in Phoenix, Arizona
  • December 13, 1999: Republican Candidates Debate in Des Moines, Iowa
  • January 24, 2000: Iowa caucuses (both parties). Iowa (caucus) Republican George W. Bush 41% John McCain 5% Alan Keyes 14% Steve Forbes 31% 9% 1% Bush wins the Iowa caucus with 41%; afterwards Orrin Hatch withdrew. Iowa (caucus) Democratic Al Gore 63% Bill Bradley 35% Others 2% Democrat Bradley did not do well in the Iowa Caucus, and does not have the support of the party establishment
  • February 1, 2000: New Hampshire primary. New Hampshire (primary) Republican George W. Bush 30% John McCain 49% Alan Keyes 6% Steve Forbes 13% 1%;  Republican candidate McCain wins the New Hampshire primary 49%–30% over Bush. New Hampshire (primary) Democratic Al Gore 50% Bill Bradley 46% Others 4% Democratic candidate Vice President Al Gore wins over Former Senator Bill Bradley
  • February 5, 2000 Delaware primary (Democrats only, Beauty contest — no delegates at stake). Delaware (primary) Democratic Al Gore 57% Bill Bradley 40% Others 3%
  • February 7, 2000: Hawaii Republican caucuses (through February 13)
    February 8, 2000: Delaware primary (Republicans only, party-run) Delaware (primary) Republican George W. Bush 51% John McCain 25% Alan Keyes 4% Steve Forbes 20% – –
  • February 18, 2000: McCain and Bush campaign biographies air in 30-minute video programs.
  • February 2000: Prior to South Carolina primary, Bush attacks McCain and implies that McCain’s adopted Bangladeshi-born daughter is an African-American child he fathered out of wedlock.
  • February 19, 2000: South Carolina Republican primary (party-run) South Carolina (primary) Republican George W. Bush 53% John McCain 42% Alan Keyes 5% – – – South Carolina Primary benefits Bush, it is the first major closed primary in 2000 and McCain popular among independents.
  • February 22, 2000: Arizona primary (Republicans only), Michigan primary (Republicans only). McCain wins Michigan, Arizona primaries. Arizona (primary) Republican George W. Bush 36% John McCain 60% Alan Keyes 4% – – – ; Michigan (primary) Republican George W. Bush 43% John McCain 50% Alan Keyes 5% – – –
  • February 23, 2000: Alaska Republican caucuses, Nevada Republican caucuses (through March 21)
  • February 24, 2000: McCain criticizes Bush for accepting the endorsement of Bob Jones University despite its policy banning interracial dating.
  • February 28, 2000: McCain refers to Rev. Jerry Falwell and televangelist Pat Robertson as “agents of intolerance.” (Senator John McCain of Arizona delivers a harsh attack on the ”self-appointed leaders” of the religious right, depicting them as intolerant empire builders who ”have turned good causes into businesses” while trying to exclude all but ”card-carrying Republicans” from the party. Mr. McCain singled out for criticism two of the Christian right’s best-known leaders, Pat Robertson, the founder of the Christian Coalition, and the Rev. Jerry Falwell, the founder of the Moral Majority.) (NYT)
  • February 29, 2000: North Dakota Republicans caucuses, Virginia primary (Republicans only), Washington primary (Democratic beauty contest — no delegates at stake)
    • Virginia (primary) Republican George W. Bush 53% John McCain 44% Alan Keyes 3%;
    • Washington (primary) Republican George W. Bush 58% John McCain 38% Alan Keyes 3%;
    • North Dakota (caucus) Republican George W. Bush 76% John McCain 19% Alan Keyes 5%
  • February 29, 2000: Washington (primary) Democratic Al Gore 68% Bill Bradley 32%
  • March 7, 2000: Super Tuesday. California primary, Connecticut primary, Georgia primary, Hawaii Democratic caucuses, Idaho Democratic caucuses, Maine primary, Maryland primary, Massachusetts primary, Missouri primary, Minnesota Republican caucuses, New York primary, North Dakota Democratic caucuses, Ohio primary, Rhode Island primary, Vermont primary, Washington caucuses (both parties)
  • March 7, 2000: Super Tuesday. Republican primaries: George W. Bush wins the majority of the Southern primaries; John McCain wins Rhode Island, Vermont, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, but withdrew from the campaign afterwards.
    • California (primary) Republican George W. Bush 61% 35% 4%
    • Connecticut (primary) Republican George W. Bush 46% 49% 3%
    • Georgia (primary) Republican George W. Bush 67% 28% 5%
    • Maine (primary) Republican George W. Bush 51% John McCain 44% Alan Keyes 3%
    • Maryland (primary) Republican George W. Bush 56% John McCain 36% Alan Keyes 7%
    • Massachusetts (primary) Republican George W. Bush 32% John McCain 65% 3%
    • Missouri (primary) Republican George W. Bush 58% John McCain 35% Alan Keyes 6%
    • New York (primary) Republican George W. Bush 51% John McCain 43% Alan Keyes 4%
    • Ohio (primary) Republican George W. Bush 58% John McCain 37% Alan Keyes 4%
    • Rhode Island (primary) Republican George W. Bush 36% John McCain 60% Alan Keyes 3%
    • Vermont (primary) Republican George W. Bush 36% John McCain 61% Alan Keyes 3%
    • Minnesota (caucus) Republican George W. Bush 63% John McCain 17%Alan Keyes  20%
    • Washington (caucus) Republican George W. Bush 80% John McCain 15% Alan Keyes 4%
  • March 7, 2000: Super Tuesday. Democratic primaries.
    • California (primary) Democratic Al Gore 81% Bill Bradley 18% Others 1%;
    • Connecticut (primary) Democratic Al Gore 55% Bill Bradley 42% Others 3%;
    • Georgia (primary) Democratic Al Gore 84% Bill Bradley 16%;
    • Missouri (primary) Democratic Al Gore 64% Bill Bradley 33% Others 1.55%; Rhode Island (primary) Democratic Al Gore 56% Bill Bradley 40% Others 2.72%;
    • Massachusetts (primary) Democratic Al Gore 59% Bill Bradley 37% Others 3.05%;
    • Maryland (primary) Democratic Al Gore 67% Bill Bradley 28% Others 4.23%
    • Maine (primary) Democratic Al Gore 54% Bill Bradley 41% Others 4.72%;
    • Ohio (primary) Democratic Al Gore 73% Bill Bradley 24% Others 1.69%;
    • New York (primary) Democratic Al Gore 65% Bill Bradley 33% Others 0.92%;
    • Vermont (primary) Democratic Al Gore 54% Bill Bradley 43% Others 1.79%
  • March 9, 2000: South Carolina Democratic caucuses (party-run, “firehouse” primary
  • March 10, 2000: Colorado primary, Utah primary, Wyoming Republican caucuses Republican candidate Alan Keyes receives 21% of the vote in Utah’s Republican primary. Colorado (primary) Democratic Al Gore 71% Bill Bradley 23% Others 5.29%; Utah (primary) Democratic Al Gore 79% Bill Bradley 20%
  • March 11, 2000: Arizona Democratic caucuses, Michigan Democratic caucuses, Minnesota Democratic caucuses. Arizona (primary) Democratic Al Gore 77% Bill Bradley 18% Others 3.23%
    March 12, 2000: Nevada Democratic caucuses
  • March 14, 2000: Florida primary, Louisiana primary, Mississippi primary, Oklahoma primary, Tennessee primary, Texas primary (both parties & Democratic caucuses).
    • Florida (primary) Republican George W. Bush 74% John McCain 20% Alan Keyes 5%; Bush clinches the Republican Party Presidential nomination.
    • Tennessee (primary) Democratic Al Gore 92% Bill Bradley 5% Others 2.61%;
    • Florida (primary) Democratic Al Gore 81% Bill Bradley 18%; Mississippi (primary) Democratic Al Gore 89% Bill Bradley 8% Others 1.78%;
    • Oklahoma (primary) Democratic Al Gore 68% Bill Bradley 25% Others 5.85%
    • Louisiana (primary) Democratic Al Gore 72% Bill Bradley 19% Others 7.13%
    • Texas (primary) Democratic Al Gore 80% Bill Bradley 16% Others 3.42%
  • March 18, 2000: Kentucky Republican caucuses
  • March 21, 2000: Illinois primary. Democratic Al Gore 84% Bill Bradley 14% Others 1.41%
  • March 25, 2000: Wyoming Democratic caucuses
  • March 27, 2000: Delaware Democratic caucuses
  • March 31, 2000: American Party Convention nominates Don Rogers for President.
  • April 4, 2000: Pennsylvania primary, Wisconsin primary
    • Pennsylvania (primary) Democratic Al Gore 74% Bill Bradley 20% Others 4.98%;
    • Wisconsin (primary) Democratic Al Gore 88% Bill Bradley 8% Others 2.69%
  • April 15, 2000: Virginia Democratic caucuses (& April 17)
  • April 22, 2000: Alaska Democratic caucuses
  • May 2, 2000: Indiana primary, North Carolina primary.
    • North Carolina (primary) Democratic Al Gore 70% Bill Bradley 18% Others 11.28%
    • Indiana (primary) Democratic Al Gore 74% Bill Bradley 21% Others 3.15%
  • May 6, 2000: Kansas Democratic caucuses
  • May 9, 2000: Nebraska primary, West Virginia primary
    • West Virginia (primary) Democratic Al Gore 72% Bill Bradley 18% Others 9.55%;
    • Nebraska (primary) Democratic Al Gore 69% Bill Bradley 26% Others 3.56%
  • May 16, 2000: Oregon primary
  • May 23, 2000: Arkansas primary, Idaho primary (Republicans only), Kentucky primary (Democrats only)  Kentucky (primary) Democratic Al Gore 71% Bill Bradley 14% Others 14.06%
  • May 25, 2000: Kansas Republican convention
  • June 6, 2000: Alabama primary, Montana primary, New Jersey primary, New Mexico primary, South Dakota primary (Kentucky (primary) Democratic Al Gore 74% Bill Bradley 20%)
  • June 25, 2000: Green Party’s National Nominating Convention convenes in  Denver, Colorado. The convention nominates Ralph Nader for President.
  • July 3, 2000: Libertarian Party Convention nominates Harry Browne for President.
  • July 25, 2000: Arizona Libertarian Party Convention nominates L. Neil Smith for President.
  • July 31-August 3, 2000: Republican National Convention convenes at First Union Center; Philadelphia and nominates on the 1st ballot George W. Bush (Texas) for President and Richard B. Cheney (Wyoming) for Vice President. The convention makes it clear that the election would be a referendum on the Clinton administration. George W. Bush chooses former Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney (Wyoming) as his running mate, although Cheney was heading his Vice Presidential search committee. Broke the tradition of “roll call” in one night, instead it is divided over several nights to give momentum and support for Bush, Cheney’s state of Wyoming was the last state on the roll call.
  • August 3, 2000: George W. Bush accepts the Presidential Nomination at the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia.
  • August 2000: Democratic nominee Al Gore distances himself from Clinton
  • August 11, 2000: Bush states in an Associated Press interview that Gore would not be like Clinton, and Clinton is a non-issue in the campaign.
  • August 14-17, 2000: Democratic National Convention convenes in the Staples Center, Los Angeles. Terry McAuliffe (New York) serves as chairman. The convention nominates by acclamation Albert A. Gore, Jr. (Tennessee) for President and Joseph I. Lieberman (Connecticut) for Vice President. Gore is the only candidate placed on the ballot. Gore chooses as his running mate Senator Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, a centrist. Lieberman is nominated unanimously. Lieberman is the first Jewish American nominated on a major party ticket.
  • August 14-17, 2000: Throughout the convention Pro-life supporters, homeless, anti-globalization, and anarchist protesters demonstrate outside the hall.
  • After the Democratic convention Gore holds the lead in the polls
  • August 19, 2000: Reform Party Convention nominates Patrick J. “Pat” Buchanan
  • August 19, 2000: Reform Party Convention (Mangia Faction) nominates John Hagelin for President.
  • August 31-September 2, 2000: The Natural Law Party Convention convenes in Hotel Alexandria Mark Center, Alexandria, Virginia and nominates John Hagelin Iowa for President and Nat Goldhaber Calfornia for Vice-President.
  • Bush leads in the polls at the start of the general election and has more money for the campaign than Gore
  • October 3, 2000: First Presidential Debate in Boston: The differences between the personalities of the two candidates are even sharper during the debates. Gore’s answers on policy are sharp and knowledgeable; however, he appears as a “smarty pants.” Bush though less precise, he appears laid-back and more relaxed which resonated with the viewers.
  • October 5, 2000: Vice-Presidential Debate in Danville, Kentucky
  • October 11, 2000: Second Presidential Debate in Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • October 17, 2000: Third Presidential Debate in St. Louis
  • Bush regains the lead in the polls
  • November 2000: Dead heat between the two candidates in the polls
  • November 3, 2000: Police documents are leaked revealing that George W. Bush has been arrested for drunk driving in 1976 in Kennebunkport, Maine. Bush admits to the 1976 drunk driving charges at a press conference ”I’m not proud of that,  I’ve oftentimes said that years ago I made some mistakes. I drank too much, and I did on that night. I regret that it happened, but it did. I’ve learned my lesson.” (NYT)
  • These revelations hurt Bush at the polls, and may have cost him a popular majority. Karl Rove, his chief political advisor, believes the news disillusioned millions of evangelical voters on whom Bush was counting on to vote for him.
  • November 7, 2000: Election Day; the numbers fluctuate all evening and into the early night. Voter exit polls indicate a lead for Gore, and many TV news sources call the election for Gore based on early returns.
  • November 7, 2000: 7:50 pm EST: Associated Press and news outlets call Florida for Gore.
  • November 7, 2000 9:30 pm: Florida looks more uncertain as the vote are counted, with more votes going to Bush.
  • November 7, 2000 10 pm: News outlets retract from their Florida projection for Gore; becomes too close to call. The election depends on Florida’s 25 electoral votes, which would have taken either candidate beyond the 270 mark.
  • November 8, 2000: 12:09 am. EST: Gore leads in the popular vote by a half a million, however, the electoral votes are even closer, with neither candidate receiving a majority of 270 in the Electoral College. Electoral vote stands at Bush 246, Gore 241, Undecided 51.
  • November 8, 2000, 2:17 am.: News outlets shift and call both Florida and a few minutes later the election for Bush. The Electoral count shifts in Bush’s favor, Electoral Vote Count: Bush 271; Gore 248; Undecided 19; Not Allocated 0
  • November 8, 2000, 2:30 am Gore concedes the election by phone to Bush.
  • November 8, 2000, 3:00 am: Gore goes from his Nashville hotel to address his supporters at Memorial Plaza and give a concession speech.
  • November 8, 2000, 3:15 am: Bush’s lead in Florida narrows, there is now only 1000 votes that separate the two candidates in Florida, prompts Gore to return to his hotel.
  • November 8, 2000, 3:30 am: Gore returns to his hotel without addressing his supporters and calls back Bush and withdraws his concession
  • November 8, 2000, 3:58 am: Bush’s lead narrows, Florida retracted from Bush
  • November 8, 2000, 3:57 and 4:15 am: New outlets retract that Bush has won Florida and the election, Florida becomes undecided
  • November 8, 2000 AM: The final margin in Florida is 1,784 votes; Bush leads Gore 2,909,135 (48.8%) to 2,907,351 (48.8%) others 139,616 votes (2.4%); The Florida vote is close enough to trigger the law for an automatic statewide recount, which gives Bush the state by less than 300 votes.
  • The Battle of the Ballots: A month ensued of disagreements about recounting the votes; filled with press conferences, lawsuits, court hearings and demonstrations
  • November 9, 2000: Gore argues that in four counties, Broward, Miami Dade, Palm Beach, and Volusia there were errors in the punch ballots caused by faulty voting machines, and that there thousands of legitimate votes that were discarded as a result of the machine’s error and if those votes were counted it would alter the election’s outcome.  (“butterfly ballots”)  The Gore campaign demands a hand recount; the Bush campaign opposes the recount. The controversial votes were in counties where Gore leading.
  • November 10, 2000: New Mexico is retracted from Gore, and Oregon goes to Gore.
  • November 11, 2000: “Bush campaign seeks a federal injunction to stop the ballot recount Gore requested in the Florida counties “because of alleged equal protection and other constitutional violations.”
  • November 12, 2000: Palm Beach County announces it is extending the hand  recount countywide. Florida’s Volusia County begins the hand counting of ballots.
  • November 13, 2000 9:00 am: Katherine Harris, a Bush supporter, campaign worker and Florida Secretary of State refuses to authorize the recount or extend the deadline to report the vote count beyond November 14, 2000 at 5:00 pm.
  • November 13, 2000: U.S. District Judge Donald Middlebrooks rejects Bush’s request to bar the hand recount in certain Florida counties.
  • November 14, 2000 Afternoon: “Circuit Judge Terry Lewis upholds 5 p.m. Tuesday deadline for Florida vote certification.”
  • November 14, 2000 Evening: “Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris announces that Bush leads Gore by 300 votes based on returns submitted by all 67 counties.”
  • November 15, 2000: Florida Attorney General Katherine Harris files a suit to the Florida Supreme requesting that they counties be required to cease their hand recounts, the Bush Campaign joins in the suit. Gore appeals to the Florida Supreme Court; Gore campaign threatens to request full state recount if the four requested counties not be allowed to continue with their hand recount. Florida Supreme Court unanimously sides with Gore. Bush refuses both Gore request to a face to face meeting, and hand recount of all Florida’s ballots.
  • ?Gore and the Democrats contest the results in Florida’s Supreme Court, who vote in four to three in Gore’s favor and order that the over 70,000 uncounted ballots in the 67 counties be reviewed in a hand count.
  • November 15, 2000 Evening: Secretary of State Harris announces she will not consider further returns from counties that are recounting their ballots (passed the original deadline?).
  • November 16, 2000: “Gore campaign files an emergency motion in Leon County state court challenging the certification of the results of the Florida presidential election.  Florida Supreme Court rules that Palm Beach County can proceed with a manual recount of ballots.” Palm Beach begins recount almost momentarily after the decision.
  • November 17, 2000 Midnight: Deadline for overseas absentee ballots to be received
  • November 17, 2000: “Leon County Circuit Judge Terry Lewis upholds Florida Secretary of State Kathrine Harris’ decision to reject late vote tallies resulting from manual recounts.” “Florida Supreme Court bars Harris from certifying the state’s presidential winner “until further order of this court” and set a Monday hearing on the recount dispute.” “The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit denies a Bush team request to stop manual recounts on constitutional grounds.”
  • November 18, 2000: “Bush’s lead over Gore in Florida triples to 930 votes after overseas absentee ballots are included.”
  • November 19, 2000: “Miami-Dade County begins a manual recount.”
  • November 20, 2000: “The Florida Supreme Court hears recount arguments from both the Gore and Bush camps regarding whether Secretary of State Harris should consider hand-recounted ballots before she certifies results of the presidential election (Palm Beach Canvassing Board v. Harris).
  • November 21, 2000: “The Florida Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, rules that that manual recounts may continue and that the totals must be included in the final results.” Court decides the recount can continue and they extend the deadline to November 26, 2000 or early Nov. 27.”
  • November 22, 2000: “Bush files petition for certiorari in United States Supreme Court, asking for review of Florida Supreme Court ruling.” “Judge Jorge Labarga rules that so-called “dimpled chads” cannot be summarily excluded from the Palm Beach manual recount.” Miami-Dade halts the recounts after pressure from “militant Republican demonstrators” and just resubmits their originals counts claiming that otherwise they would miss the deadline.
  • November 23, 2000: “On Thanksgiving Day, Al Gore’s campaign files papers with the Florida Supreme Court, asking the judges to force Miami-Dade County to resume its manual recount. The Florida Supreme Court rejects Gore request.”
  • November 24, 2000: “The U.S. Supreme Court agrees to hear arguments in an appeal from George W. Bush on Florida Supreme Court’s November 21 ruling that selective manual recounts must be included in the state’s final presidential tally. The hearing set for December 1.”
  • November 25, 2000: “Bush drops his lawsuit to force Florida counties to reconsider overseas military ballots that were rejected for technical reasons.”
  • November 26, 2000: Palm Beach County misses the recount deadline, Secretary of State Katherine Harris declines the county’s request to extend the deadline, 1000 votes are not recounted. Katherine Harris and state canvassing board certify Bush the winner of the states electoral votes, by 537 votes over Gore. “Governor Jeb Bush signs the Certificate of Ascertainment designating 25 Florida electors pledged to George W. Bush and transmits the document to the National Archives as required by Title 3, U.S. Code, Section 6.”
  • November 27, 2000: “Al Gore files an election contest action under Florida Election Code section 102.168, challenging the vote counts in Palm Beach, Miami-Dade, and Nassau counties.” Bush lawyers files a motion to prevent Gore’s legal arguments from being heard.
  • November 28, 2000: “Democrats ask Leon County Circuit Court Judge N. Saunders Sauls to authorize an immediate recount of about 14,000 disputed ballots. Judge Sauls orders the disputed ballots, sample voting booths, and voting machines from Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties brought to his courtroom in Tallahassee by Friday.”
  • November 29, 2000: “Deadline for briefs to be filed before the U.S. Supreme Court on Bush appeal of Florida Supreme Court’s ruling selective manual recounts.”
  • November 30, 2000: “Deadline for replies to be filed before the U.S. Supreme Court on Bush appeal of Florida Supreme Court’s ruling on selective manual recounts.” “Democrats file papers in the Florida Supreme Court asking the Democratic justices to order an immediate hand recount of some 14,000 disputed ballots in two heavily Democratic Florida counties.”
  • Republicans immediately appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court claiming the recount violated Bush the 14th amendment’s equal protection of the laws.
  • December 1, 2000: “U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments on Bush challenge on constitutional grounds of Florida Supreme Court’s ruling on selective manual recounts. (Bush v. Palm Beach Canvassing Board)” Florida Supreme Courts rejects Gore request to recount by hand ballots from Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta agrees to hear cases objecting to the hand recounts, and arguing they are unconstitutional.
  • December 2, 2000: “Florida Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls holds a trial to consider Gore’s request for a hand count of 14,000 contested ballots Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties.”
  • December 4, 2000: “U.S. Supreme Court rules in Bush v. Palm Beach Canvassing Board, vacating the order of the Florida Supreme Court and remanding for clarification the Florida Supreme Court’s November 21 decision on recount deadlines.” “Florida Judge N. Sanders Sauls rules against Gore, refuses Gore’s request to overturn George W. Bush’s certified statewide victory.”
  • December 6, 2000: Atlanta 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denies Bush appeal to throw out manual recounts in three Florida counties.
  • December 7, 2000: “Florida Supreme Court hears arguments from both Al Gore and George W. Bush’s lawyers in the vice president’s appeal of Florida Circuit Court Judge Sauls’ ruling.”
  • December 8, 2000: “The Florida Supreme Court, in 4-3 split decision, reverses lower court rejection of Gore contest, ordering statewide manual recounts of undervotes.”  “Leon County Circuit Court Judges Terry Lewis and Nikki Clark refuse to throw out any of the 25,000 absentee ballots challenged by the Gore camp in Martin and Seminole counties.” “Bush seeks stays before the Florida Supreme Court, the 11th Circuit, and the U.S. Supreme Court and additionally petitions the U.S. Supreme Court for certiorari.”
  • December 9, 2000: “Florida begins a statewide manual recount of the undervote ballots.” “Florida Supreme Court denies Bush’s application for a stay.” “The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit in Atlanta similarly denies Bush’s emergency motion to stop the recount, but orders Florida officials not to change his previously certified 537-vote lead.” The Supreme Court votes 5-4 to halt the recount, held hearing and heard arguments from both sides counsel
  • December 11, 2000: “U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments in Gore v. Bush. on the Florida recount”
  • December 12, 2000 12:10 pm: the Supreme Court issues their final decision in Bush vs. Gore, in a 7-2 ruling they halt the recount, on grounds that the there were no uniform standard to determine what was the intention of the voters in question and the recount was unconstitutional. Additionally recounts could not be completed by the December 12 “safe harbor” deadline and prior to the December 18 Electoral College vote, and therefore the certified vote would be upheld.
  • December 13, 2000: Al Gore gives a nationally telecast concession and George W. Bush gives his acceptance speech.
  • December 18, 2000: Presidential Electors meet to cast the electoral votes in their state capitols.

 

 


2004

 

  • September 11, 2001: War on Terror, (9 /11, terrorist attacks in New York, Washington, and Pennsylvania); subsequent ground war in Afghanistan; “Homeland Security” (“Terrorists hijack four commercial jets and crash them into the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., and the Pennsylvania countryside. It is the worst attack on American soil since Pearl Harbor, with fatalities numbering about 3,000. Addressing the nation twelve hours after the attacks, President Bush vows to hunt down those responsible.”)
  • September 20, 2001: “President Bush appears before a joint session of Congress to outline the administration’s plans to defeat world terrorism, singling out Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaeda organization as the primary targets of such a policy.”
  • October 7, 2001: “Speaking from the Treaty Room of the White House, President Bush announces the commencement of military action in Afghanistan, an operation code-named “Enduring Freedom.””
  • January 29, 2002: “In his State of the Union address, President Bush warns that the war against terrorism is only beginning. Specifically citing North Korea, Iran, and Iraq, Bush speaks of “an axis of evil” threatening world peace.”
  • May 16, 2002: “Congress presses the Bush administration for further information about warnings of the September 11, 2001, attacks. National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice holds a briefing, maintaining, “I don’t think that anybody could have predicted that these people would take an airplane and slam it into the World Trade Center, take another one and slam it into the Pentagon.” She insists that there was no lapse in intelligence.”
  • October 10, 2002: “House of Representatives votes 296 to 133, with three no votes authorizing the use of military force in Iraq.”  The war in Iraq; divisive issue, Bush administration suggested possible Weapons of Mass Destruction or Al Qaeda ties as clear proof that Saddam had nuclear capabilities and was conspiring with Bin Laden.
  • October 11, 2002: “the Senate passes the resolution 77 to 23; Subsequent instability and continual terrorism in Iraq.”
  • November 2002: Republican victory in the mid-term elections; they maintain control of House of Representatives, gain four seats, and recapture the Senate by winning two additional seats.
  • May 31, 2002: Former Governor of Vermont Howard Dean announces he is forming a presidential exploratory committee, to run for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • June 6, 2002: President Bush gives a televised address announcing a reorganization of the Office of Homeland Security, which will “now coordinate a wide range of functions and oversee more than 100 organizations.” “The announcement follows criticism of the FBI and CIA for failing to prevent the September 11 attacks.”
  • September 4, 2002: “Seeking support for action against Iraq, President Bush addresses Congress, identifying Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein as “a serious threat.” Bush mentions the concept of a regime change and announces the visit of British Prime Minister Tony Blair in the days to come. House Majority Whip Tom DeLay (R-TX) calls action in Iraq “inevitable.””
  • September 12, 2002: “President Bush addresses the United Nations’ Security Council, making his case for military action to enforce UN resolutions in Iraq. Additionally, he warns that the United States will move alone if the Council does not act.”
  • October 10, 2002: A bipartisan Senate vote of 77-23 gives authorization to Bush to use force against Iraq. The Senate vote follows a similar vote of 296-133 in the House in support of the bill.
  • November 5, 2002: Mid term elections: Republicans gain control of the Senate and retain a majority in the House.
  • December 1, 2002: Massachusetts Senator John F. Kerry announces he is  planning to form a presidential exploratory committee, to run for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • December 16, 2002: Gore announces CBS’s 60 Minutes he would not run for the Democratic Presidential nomination. Democrats suspected that Al Gore might run again, a rematch of the 2000 campaign and election.
  • December 20, 2002: “Following a United Nations report issued by arms inspectors indicating that Iraq remained in violation of Security Council Resolution 1441, Bush speaks out again against Iraq. Inspections in Iraq continue.”
  • January 2, 2003: U.S. Senator John R. Edwards (North Carolina) announces he is forming a presidential exploratory committee to run for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • January 4, 2003: U.S. Rep. Richard A. “Dick” Gephardt (Missouri) announces he will run for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • January 5, 2003: Reverend Al Sharpton (New York) announces he will run for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • January 7, 2003: Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, announces that he will not run for President in 2004.
  • January 13, 2003: Democrat Joseph Lieberman launches his campaign, supports Bush’s War on Terror, his position are increasingly to most Democrats’ right.
  • January 17, 2003: Libertarian Gary Nolan files papers to form an exploratory committee for a presidential run, and announces he will run for the Presidency.
  • January 22, 2003: Draft Steve Jobs, Apple Computer CEO launches a website http://www.jobs4president.org/.
  • February 18, 2003: Former Senator Illinois Carol Moseley Braun announces she is running for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • February 19, 2003: Representative Dennis Kucinich (Ohio) files papers to form an exploratory committee to run for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • February 22, 2003: Dean insists he represents the “Democratic wing of the Democratic party.” ”I’m Howard Dean, and I’m here to represent the Democratic wing of the Democratic Party”
  • February 27, 2003: Senator Bob Graham (Florida) announces he is running for the  Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • March 16, 2003: “After months of debate in the United Nations Security Council, President Bush announces the U.S. intention to move against Iraq with its coalition of allies. Bush issues an ultimatum for military action, giving Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein and his sons forty-eight hours to leave Iraq.”
  • March 19, 2003: “The 8:00 p.m. deadline for Hussein to leave Iraq passes. At 10:15 p.m., Bush addresses the nation and informs the American people that the United States is at war with Iraq.”
  • March 25, 2003: “Citing costs of the Iraq War, the Senate approves, by a vote of 51-48, the reduction of Bush’s tax cut plan to $350 million, less than half of the original amount.”
  • April 9, 2003: First of Sixteen Democratic Primary Debates commences. The organizers usually are interest groups, representing, among others, the pro-choice community, the elderly, labor unions, African-Americans, Hispanics, and women
  • April 10, 2003: “President Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair air a joint address on Iraqi television that describes the goals of coalition forces and reassures the Iraqi people that they will be able to live their lives in peace and security in a post-Saddam era.”
  • May 1, 2003: “In a nationally televised address aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln, Bush stands in front of a “Mission Accomplished” banner and declares that major combat operations in Iraq are over. He links the Iraq War to the War on Terror and vows to continue searching for banned weapons in Iraq.”
  • May 3, 2003: George Stephanopoulos ABC news moderates the first Democratic Primary debate at the University of South Carolina campus in Columbia, during South Carolina’s Democratic Weekend. (Braun, Dean, Edwards, Gephardt, Graham, Kerry, Kucinich, Lieberman and Sharpton)  Howard Dean is the big winner of the early rounds of televised Democratic Presidential primary debates.
  • May 7, 2003: Vice President Dick Cheney announces he will run for reelection as Vice President in 2004 as part of the Republican ticket.
  • May 16, 2003: President Bush files with the Federal Election Commission papers to run for reelection. May 22, 2003: The UN Security Council votes to lift sanctions on Iraq imposed since the 1991 Gulf War. The resolution gives the United States and United Kingdom control of Iraq until it establishes a legitimate government and authority to use Iraqi oil revenues for humanitarian aid and reconstruction.
  • May 28, 2003: “Bush signs into law his $350 billion tax-cut package, the third-largest in history, in an effort to strengthen the U.S. economy and reverse a trend of increasing unemployment.”
  • June 23, 2003: Howard Dean formally announces that he is running for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • June 26, 2003: MoveOn.org Presidential Vote Howard Dean
  • July 11, 2003: “CIA Director George Tenet accepts full responsibility for the statement in Bush’s 2003 State of the Union Address regarding Iraq’s alleged effort to obtain uranium from Africa, saying its inclusion should not have been approved by the CIA because the intelligence was unsubstantiated and the claim had been discredited.”
  • July 22, 2003: “U.S. forces kill Saddam Hussein’s two sons Uday and Qusay in Mosul, Iraq. Officials hope that anti-U.S. attacks in Iraq will decrease as a result. Saddam Hussein’s whereabouts are unknown.”
  • July 24, 2003: “The joint Congressional Committee on Intelligence releases an 800-page document on the findings of its inquiry into intelligence failures leading up to the terrorist attacks of September 11.”
  • September 16, 2003: John Edwards goes on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and formally announces he will run for President.
  • September 17, 2003: Wesley Clark is the last Democratic candidate entering the race; He campaigns in opposition to the Iraq war, but in a contradictory remark claims “he might have supported the war resolution but questioned the war.”
  • October 2, 2003: “Chief U.S. Weapons Inspector David Kay reports that his 1,400 member team, the Iraq Survey Group, failed to find any biological, chemical, or nuclear weapons in Iraq. Kay acknowledged that they did find evidence that Iraq sought the capacity to create those weapons in the future. Bush used these findings as validation of his prewar claims that Iraq posed a significant security threat to the United States.”
  • October 19, 2003: Socialist Party Convention nominates Walter F. “Walt” Brown for President.
  • October 6, 2003: Bob Graham announces he is ending his Presidential run on Larry King Live.
  • December 9, 2003: Al Gore endorses Dean, instead of his 2000 campaign running mate Joe Lieberman. The endorsement ruins Lieberman’s presidential prospects and confirms that Dean is the Democratic frontrunner.
  • December 13, 2003: Saddam Hussein’s capture, American soldiers in Iraq capture a bearded, wild-looking Saddam Hussein hiding in a “spider hole,” a cramped, one-person foxhole. The former Iraqi dictator’s demise boosts Bush’s standing in the polls.
  • January 2, 2004: Maine Republican caucuses (through March 19)
  • January 10, 2004: American Party selects Diane Beall Templin for their Presidential nominee.
  • January 17, 2004: South Carolina Republican caucuses (through February 21)
  • January 19, 2004: Iowa caucuses (both parties)
  • January 25, 2004: Hawaii Republican caucuses (through February 7)
  • January 27, 2004: New Hampshire primary
  • January 14, 2004: District of Columbia Democratic (primary) Carol Moseley Braun 12% — Howard Dean 43% Dennis Kucinich 8% Al Sharpton 34%
  • Kerry surges in the polls prior to the Iowa caucus
  • January 19, 2004: Martin Luther King Day, Iowa caucus: John Kerry, won with nearly 38 percent of the vote; Senator John Edwards, second with 32 percent of the vote; Dean came in third, winning 18.6 percent of votes; Dick Gephardt, 10.6 percent of the vote. Iowa Democratic (caucus) Howard Dean 18% (5) John Edwards 32% (10) Richard Gephardt 11% John Kerry 38% (30) Dennis Kucinich 1%
  • January 19, 2004: “Dean Scream” “I Have A Scream” Speech (Concession Speech Iowa Caucus, prompting Dean to quit); Democrat Howard Dean screams through the end of his Iowa caucus concession speech to excite the audience. Television news replays the scream speech 663 times in four days, and it goes viral on the internet.
  • January 22, 2004: Democratic Candidates Debate in Manchester, New Hampshire
  • January 27, 2004: New Hampshire primary, Kerry won 39 percent of the vote, Howard Dean, came in second with 26 percent. Wesley Clark and John Edwards, both received 12 percent of the vote. Joe Lieberman, came in fifth with 9 percent. New Hampshire Democratic (primary) Wesley Clark 12% Howard Dean 26% (9) John Edwards 12%John Kerry 38% (13) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 9%
  • January 29, 2004: Democratic Candidates Debate in Greenville, South Carolina
  • February 1, 2004: North Carolina Republican caucuses (through March 31)
  • February 1, 2004: Prohibition Party Convention nominates Gene C. Amondson for President.
  • February 3, 2004: “Mini-Tuesday” or Super Tuesday I, (seven primaries) Arizona primary (Democrats only), Delaware primary (Democrats only), Missouri primary, New Mexico Democratic caucuses, North Dakota caucuses, Oklahoma primary, South Carolina primary (Democrats only, party-run), Wyoming Republican caucuses (through February 29). Kerry won Arizona, Delaware, Missouri, New Mexico and North Dakota. Clark won Oklahoma; Edwards carried South Carolina. Lieberman lost Delaware and dropped out.
    • Arizona Democratic (primary) Wesley Clark 27% (14) Howard Dean 14% (3) John Edwards 7% John Kerry 43% (38) Dennis Kucinich 2% Joseph Lieberman 7%
    • Delaware Democratic (primary) Wesley Clark 9% Howard Dean 10% John Edwards 11% Richard Gephardt 1% John Kerry 50% (14) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 11% Al Sharpton 6% (1);
    • Missouri Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 4% Howard Dean 9% John Edwards 25% (26) Richard Gephardt 2% John Kerry 51% (48) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 4% Al Sharpton 3%;
    • New Mexico Democratic (caucus) – Wesley Clark 21% (8) Howard Dean 16% (4) John Edwards 11% Richard Gephardt 1% John Kerry 42% (14) Dennis Kucinich 6% Joseph Lieberman 3%
    • North Dakota Democratic (caucus) – Wesley Clark 24% (5) Howard 12% 10% 1% John Kerry 51% (9) Dennis Kucinich 3% Joseph Lieberman 1% –;
    • Oklahoma Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 30% (15) Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 30% (13) 1% John Kerry 27% (12) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 7% Al Sharpton 1%;
    • South Carolina Democratic (primary) — 7% 5% 45% (27) – John Kerry 30% (17) – Joseph Lieberman 2% Al Sharpton 10% (1)
  • February 4, 2004: Virginia Republican caucuses (through April 4)
  • February 7, 2004: Michigan primary (Democrats only, party-run), Washington Democratic caucuses, Louisiana Republican caucuses.
    • Michigan Democratic (caucus) – Wesley Clark 7% Howard Dean 17% (24) John Edwards 13% (6) Richard Gephardt 1% John Kerry 52% (91) Dennis Kucinich 3% — Al Sharpton 7% (7);
    • Washington Democratic (caucus) – Wesley Clark 3% Howard Dean 30% (29) John Edwards 7% — John Kerry 48% (47) Dennis Kucinich 8%
  • February 8, 2004: Maine Democratic caucuses Maine Democratic (caucus) Wesley Clark 4% Howard Dean 27% (9) John Edwards 8% — John Kerry 45% (15) Dennis Kucinich 16%
  • February 10, 2004: Nevada Republican caucuses, Tennessee primary, Virginia primary (Democrats only)
    • Tennessee Democratic (primary) Carol Moseley Braun 1% Wesley Clark 23% (18) Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 26% (20) – John Kerry 41% (31) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 1% Al Sharpton 2%;
    • Virginia Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 9% Howard Dean 7% John Edwards 27% (29) – John Kerry 52% (53) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 1% Al Sharpton 3%
  • February 14, 2004: Nevada Democratic caucuses
    • District of Columbia Democratic (caucus) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 17% (3) John Edwards 10% — John Kerry 47% (9) Dennis Kucinich 3% — Al Sharpton 20% (4);
    • Nevada (caucus) Howard Dean 17% (2) John Edwards 10% John Kerry 63% (18) Dennis Kucinich 7% Al Sharpton 1%
  • February 17, 2004: Wisconsin primary: Dean receives 18 percent of the vote. John Edwards finishes a strong second in Wisconsin. Wisconsin Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 2% Howard Dean 18% (13) John Edwards 34% (24) – John Kerry 40% (30) Dennis Kucinich 3% — Al Sharpton 2%
  • February 19, 2004: Howard Dean suspends his campaign, and eventually endorses John Kerry.
  • February 21, 2004: Alaska Republican caucuses (through April 17)
  • February 24, 2004: Hawaii Democratic caucuses, Idaho Democratic caucuses, Utah primary (party-run)
    • Hawaii Democratic (caucus) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 7% John Edwards 13% — John Kerry 47% (12) Dennis Kucinich 31% (8) — –;
    • Idaho Democratic (caucus) — Howard Dean 11% John Edwards 22% (6) – John Kerry 54% (12) Dennis Kucinich 6%
    • Utah Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 30% (3) – John Kerry 55% (5) Dennis Kucinich 7% Joseph Lieberman 1% –
  • February 29, 2004: Last Democratic Candidates debate.
  • March 1, 2004: Delaware Republican caucuses (through May 15 — State convention), Kansas Republican caucuses (through June 15)
  • March 2, 2004: Super Tuesday, or Super Tuesday II (nine states holding primaries and Minnesota caucusing) California primary, Connecticut primary (Republican canceled), Georgia primary, Maryland primary, Massachusetts primary, Minnesota caucuses (both parties), New York primary (Republican canceled), Ohio primary, Rhode Island primary, Vermont primary. Kerry wins California, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Ohio and Rhode Island
    • California Democratic (primary) Carol Moseley Braun 1% Wesley Clark 2% Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 20% (82) Richard Gephardt 1% John Kerry 64% (288) Dennis Kucinich 5% Joseph Lieberman 2% Al Sharpton 4%;
    • Connecticut Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 24% (14) – John Kerry 58% (35) Dennis Kucinich 3% Joseph Lieberman 5% Al Sharpton 3%;
    • Georgia Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 2% John Edwards 42% (32) – John Kerry 47% (37) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 1% Al Sharpton 6%;
    • Maryland Democratic (primary) Carol Moseley Braun 1% Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 3% John Edwards 26% (13) – John Kerry 60% (26) Dennis Kucinich 2% Jospeh Lieberman 1% Al Sharpton 5%;
    • Massachusetts Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 3% John Edwards 18% (13) – John Kerry 72% (80) Dennis Kucinich 4% Jospeh Liberman 1% Al Shapton 1%;
    • Minnesota Democratic (caucus) — Howard Dean 2% John Edwards 27% (22) – John Kerry 51% (41) Dennis Kucinich 17% (9) – Al Sharpton 1%;
    • New York (primary) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 3% John Edwards 20% (54) Richard Gephardt 1% John Kerry 61% (174) Dennis Kucinich 5% Joseph Liberman 1% Al Sharpton 8% (8);
    • Ohio Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 3% John Edwards 34% (55) Richard Gephardt 1% John Kerry 52% (81) Dennis Kucinich 9% (4) Joseph Lieberman 1% –;
    • Rhode Island Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 19% (4) – John Kerry 71% (17) Dennis Kucinich 3% Joseph Lieberman 1% –
    • Vermont (primary) [73] – Wesley Clark 3% Howard Dean 53% (9) John Edwards 6% — John Kerry 31% (6) Dennis Kucinich 4%
  • March 3, 2004: Edwards withdraws from the Democratic Presidential race, in his speech he has gracious words for Kerry. Kerry calls Edwards a “valiant champion of the values for which our party stands.” The exchange fuels speculation that Kerry will choose Edwards as his running mate.
  • March 6-20, 2004: Wyoming Democratic caucuses
  • March 8, 2004: “The Iraqi Governing Council signs an interim constitution to provide a framework for establishment of a transitional government.”
  • March 9, 2004: Florida primary (Republican canceled), Louisiana primary, Mississippi primary (Republican canceled), North Carolina Democratic caucuses, Texas primary (both parties & Democratic caucuses), Washington Republican caucuses
    • American Samoa Democratic (caucus) John Kerry 83% (6) Dennis Kucinich 17%;
    • Florida Democratic (primary) Carol Moseley Braun 1% Wesley Clark 1% 3% 10% (3) 1% John Kerry 77% (119) Dennis Kucinich 2% Joseph Lieberman 2% Al Sharpton 3%;
    • Louisiana Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 4% Howard Dean 5% John Edwards 16% (10) — John Kerry 70% (42) Dennis Kucinich 1% — —
    • Mississippi Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 2% Howard Dean 3% John Edwards 7% — John Kerry 78% (33) Dennis Kucinich 1% Joseph Lieberman 1% Al Sharpton 5%;
    • Texas Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 2% Howard Dean 5% John Edwards 14% (11) Richard Gephardt 1% John Kerry 67% (62) Dennis Kucinich 2% Joseph Lieberman 3% Al Sharpton 4%
  • March 11, 2004: John Kerry accumulates the 2,162 delegates required to clinch the Democratic Presidential nomination.
  • March 10, 2004: Bush clinches the number of delegates required for the nomination, 1608 Delegates and 168 Super delegates.
  • March 13, 2004: Kansas Democratic caucuses. Wesley Clark 1% Howard Dean 7% (1) John Edwards 9% — John Kerry 72% (32) Dennis Kucinich 10%
  • March 16, 2004: Illinois primary. Illinois Democratic (primary) Carol Moseley Braun 4% Wesley Clark 2% 4% 11% (2) – John Kerry 72% (154) Dennis Kucinich 2% Joseph Lieberman 2% Al Sharpton 3%
  • March 20, 2004: Alaska Democratic caucuses. Alaska Democratic (caucus) Howard Dean 11% John Edwards 3% — John Kerry 48% (8) Dennis Kucinich 27% (5) Wyoming Democratic (caucus) Howard Dean 3% John Edwards 5% John Kerry 77% (13) Dennis Kucinich 6% — Al Sharpton 1%
  • March 23, 2004: Utah Republican caucuses
  • March 27, 2004: Expatriates 5 Democratic (caucus) – Wesley Clark 10% Howard Dean 19% (2.5) John Edwards 9% — John Kerry 56% (4.5) Dennis Kucinich 5% — Al Sharpton 1%
  • April 3, 2004: Arizona Republican caucuses (through April 17)
  • April 4, 2004: “U.S. forces in Iraq confront a violent uprising beginning with Shiite Muslims in Baghdad and spreading to Sunni guerrillas in Fallujah, leading to the heaviest fighting since the invasion began in March of 2003.”
  • April 13, 2004: Colorado caucuses (both parties)
  • April 13, 2004: Colorado Democratic (caucus) Howard Dean 2% John Wards 1% — John Kerry 64% (39) Dennis Kucinich 13% (4)
  • April 17, 2004: North Carolina Democratic (caucus) Howard Dean 6% John Edwards 52% (57) – John Kerry 27% (29) Dennis Kucinich 12% (4) – Al Sharpton 3%; Virgin Islands Democratic (caucus) John Kerry (3)
  • April 24, 2004: Guam Democratic (caucus) John Kerry 77% (3)
  • April 27, 2004: Pennsylvania primary. Pennsylvania Democratic (primary) Howard Dean 10% (1) John Edwards 10% — John Kerry 74% (120) Dennis Kucinich 4%
  • April 28, 2004: CBS reports that there have been acts of torture and sexual humiliation occurring at Iraq’s massive Abu Ghraib prison in Guantanamo, Cuba. “Bush and other senior administration officials voice deep disapproval over these abuses.
  • May 4, 2004: Indiana primary Indiana Democratic (primary) – Wesley Clark 6% Howard Dean 7% John Edwards 11% — John Kerry 73% (62) Dennis Kucinich 2%
  • May 11, 2004: Reform Party nominates Ralph Nader for President.
  • May 11, 2004: West Virginia primary.
    • Nebraska Democratic (primary) Howard Dean 7% John Edwards 14%  John Kerry 73% (24) Dennis Kucinich 2% — Al Sharpton 2%;
    • West Virginia Democratic (primary) Wesley Clark 3% Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 13%  John Kerry 70% (28) Dennis Kucinich 2% Joseph Lieberman 6%
  • May 18, 2004: Arkansas primary, Kentucky primary, Oregon primary.
    • Arkansas Democratic (primary) John Kerry 66% (29) Dennis Kucinich 5%;
    • Kentucky Democratic (primary) Wesley Clark 3% Howard Dean 4% John Edwards 14% John Kerry 60% (44) Dennis Kucinich 2% Joseph Lieberman 5% Al Sharpton 2%;
    • Oregon (primary) John Kerry 81% (38) Dennis Kunnich 17% (4)
  • May 25, 2004: Idaho primary (Republicans only)
  • May 30, 2004: Libertarian Party Convention nominates Michael Badnarik for President.
  • Moveon.org’s internet ad contest “Bush in Thirty Seconds” results in two ads comparing the President to Adolf Hitler. “A nation warped by lies. Lies fuel fear. Fear fuels aggression. Invasion. Occupation. What were war crimes in 1945 is foreign policy in 2003.” When Republicans objected, Moveon.org quickly pulled the ads.
  • June 1, 2004: US Constitution Party Convention nominates Michael A. Peroutka for President.
  • June 1, 2004: June 1, 2004: Alabama primary, New Mexico primary (Republicans only), South Dakota primary (Republicans canceled) Alabama Democratic (primary) John Kerry 75% (47) Dennis Kucinich 4% South Dakota (primary) Howard Dean 6% John Kerry 82% (14) Dennis Kucinich 2%
  • June 3, 2004: “Bush announces he has accepted the resignation of CIA Director George Tenet, widely blamed for intelligence failures in the months leading up to September 11.”
  • June 6, 2004:  Puerto Rico Democratic (caucus) John Kerry (51)
  • June 8, 2004: Montana primary (Democrats only, Republican beauty contest — no delegates at stake), New Jersey primary Montana Democratic (primary) Wesley Clark 4%  John Edwards 9% John Kerry 68% (15) Dennis Kucinich 11% New Jersey (primary) John Kerry 92% (106) Dennis Kucinich 4%
  • June 8, 2004: “Attorney General John Ashcroft appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee to answer questions regarding two leaked government memoranda that contained legal arguments for circumventing U.S. and international bans on torture, specifically for the questioning of terrorist suspects.”
  • June 10, 2004: Montana Republican convention (through June 12)
  • June 5-11, 2004: Bush receives a surprising boost in early June when former President Ronald Reagan dies. Reagan’s funeral makes Bush look presidential, while Kerry is consistently cast as the challenger.
  • June 23, 2004: Michael Moore’s Fahrenheit 9/11 is released in movie theaters. The documentary portrays the President as clueless and corrupt. It earns $23.9 million its first weekend, an unprecedented amount for a documentary and quickly breaks the $100 million mark.
  • June 26, 2004: Green Party Convention nominates David Keith Cobb for President.
  • June 28, 2004: “The U.S.-led Coalition for Provisional Authority formerly ends foreign occupation of Iraq, granting the provisional government sovereignty. Still, 130,000 troops remain in Iraq.”
  • July 2004: Anthrax scare at John Kerry’s campaign headquarters
  • July 6, 2004: John Kerry announces he chose John Edwards as his running mate for the Democratic ticket.
  • July 26-29, 2004: Democratic National Convention convenes at the Fleet Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Bill Richardson (New Mexico) serves as chairman. The convention nominates on the 1st ballot John F. Kerry (Massachusetts) for President, and John R. Edwards (North Carolina) for Vice President. Speakers include President Jimmy Carter, Senator Hilary Clinton of New York, former Vice President Al Gore, Reverend Al Sharpton, and retired General John Shalikashvili. Topics include terrorism and the war in Iraq, health care, taxes, and economic revival.
  • To prevent protester disturbances of the 2000 convention there is a designated area for protesters surrounded by a fence and topped with razor wire
  • July 26, 2004: Monday night, features the Democrats’ headliners: Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, Al Gore and Hillary Rodham Clinton.
  • July 27, 2004: Tuesday: Kerry’s wife Teresa speaks, the keynote speech  is given by a relatively unknown young Illinois state senator Barack Obama, the networks do not cover his speech, however, it electrifies the audience, and is seen by others through cable news and You Tube (video sharing site). Reception to Obama’s speech bursts the Illinois U.S. Senatorial candidate into the national stage. “We worship an awesome God in the blue states, and we don’t like federal agents poking around our libraries in the red states. We coach little league in the blue states and, yes, we’ve got some gay friends in the red states.”
  • Ron Reagan, the son of former President Ronald Reagan speaks of his father’s battle with Alzheimer’s disease, and the need to support increased funding for stem cell research.
  • July 29, 2004: John F. Kerry gives an address accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Boston.
  • August 1, 2004: Peace and Freedom Party Convention nominates Leonard Peltier for President.
  • August 5, 2004: The Swift Vets and POWs for Truth; Swift Boat Veterans for Truth launches one of the most effective advertising attacks in campaigning history, widely-publicized commercials, a best-selling book, and numerous other media initiatives. Approximately 250 of the 3500 veterans who served on Swift Boats during Vietnam attack Kerry’s character and defining political narrative as a war hero.
  • August 30-September 2, 2004: Republican National Convention convenes at  Madison Square Garden, New York and renominates on the 1st ballot, George W. Bush (Texas) for President and Richard B. Cheney (Wyoming) for Vice President. The convention’s theme is “Fulfilling America’s Promise by Building a Safer World and a More Hopeful America.”
  • September 2, 2004: George W. Bush gives remarks accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Republican National Convention in New York City.
  • August 30-September 2, 2004: 800 anti-Bush groups protest outside the convention. United for Peace and Justice organizes a march of protesters past the convention site, 250,000 to 800,000 attend and 1800 protesters are arrested breaking records for protest at a Presidential nominating convention.
  • September 30, 2004: Jim Lehrer of PBS moderates First Presidential Debate in Coral Gables, Florida, University of Miami. Kerry wins, Bush is criticized for his scowling demeanor.
  • September 8, 2004: Killian documents: CBS’s veteran news anchor Dan Rather broadcasts a report on “60 Minutes II” claiming Bush shirked his duty while serving in the Air National Guard from 1972 to 1973. Memoranda supposedly written by Bush’s commander, the late Lieutenant Colonel Jerry B. Killian, corroborated the rumors, which had dogged Bush for years. Bloggers quickly prove the documents to be forgeries, noting that the centering of the type on the page was standard in the computer era yet rare in the early 1970s. The segment’s producer and Dan Rather later resign.
  • September 14, 2004:  “Typist says Memos on Bush are fake but accurate.” (NYT)
  • September 22, 2004: “CBS News names former Pennsylvania governor and U.S. Attorney General Dick Thornburgh and retired Associated Press president chief executive Louis D. Boccardi to an independent panel to probe a story about President Bush’s National Guard service.” (CBS News)
  • October 5, 2004: Vice-Presidential Debate in Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio is moderated by Gwen Ifill of PBS
  • October 8, 2004: Charles Gibson of ABC moderates Second Presidential Debate in St. Louis, Missouri, Washington University. Bush performs better, but still appears angry and flustered, unlike the cool Kerry.
  • October 13, 2004: Bob Schieffer of CBS News moderates the third Presidential Debate at Arizona State University. Bush does not win the third debate, which emphasizes the economy. The debates boosts Kerry’s poll numbers because he appears more presidential.
  • October 29, 2004: Threatening Osama Bin Laden tape released a week prior to the election. “Qatar-based television channel Al-Jazeera airs excerpts from a videotape of Osama bin-Laden, leader of the terrorist network al-Qaeda, who addresses the American people. Many view this tape as an attempt by al-Qaeda to influence the U.S. presidential election.”
  • November 2, 2004: Election Day, Republicans George W. Bush is reelected President and Richard B. Cheney is reelected Vice President.
  • November 8, 2004: “U.S. troops launch an assault to retake the rebel-controlled city of Fallujah in the largest military operation since the initial invasion in March of 2003.”
  • November 15, 2004: “Retired Army general and Secretary of State Colin Powell resigns. Bush appoints former National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice to the position.”
  • December 13, 2004: Presidential Electors cast the electoral vote in their state capitols.

 


2008

 

  • February 2, 2005: “In his State of the Union, President Bush calls for an historic restructuring of Social Security, allowing workers to use their payroll taxes to invest in the stock market. However, he is unable to move the policy through Congress.”
  • August 28, 2005: “Hurricane Katrina strikes the southern coast of the United States with devastating effects. The storm breaches the levee system in New Orleans, causing massive flooding and destruction of property. The Bush administration is harshly criticized for an inadequate response by the federal government to the storm’s destruction.”
  • September 29, 2005: “John G. Roberts is confirmed as Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Roberts replaces William Rehnquist, who died in office, and is President Bush’s first nominee to the Court.”
  • March 21, 2006: “In a White House news conference, President Bush admits for the first time that the complete removal of U.S. troops from Iraq during the remainder of his term is improbable. He continues to assert the fact that progress is being made in the establishment of Iraqi democracy.”
  • May 4, 2006: “The U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Virginia, sentences Zacarias Moussaoui to life in prison without parole for his role in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Moussaoui was the first person to stand trial for the attacks.”
  • 2006: Early Republican front runners are New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani; Arizona Senator John McCain
  • October 26, 2006: “President Bush signs a bill providing for the construction of a 700-mile fence along the United States-Mexico border, in an effort to increase border security and stem illegal immigration.”
  • November 2006: Mid Term Elections, Democrats gain majorities in both Houses of Congress. The election is considered a referendum on Bush and his administration. The new Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi is Congress’s first female Speaker, and is a San Francisco liberal who epitomizes “the ascendant, assertive, angry, Bushophobic Democratic Party.”
  • December 28, 2006: John Edwards formally announces and launches his campaign in New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • December 30, 2006: “Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is hanged in Baghdad, Iraq, after being convicted of crimes against humanity dating back to 1982.”
  • January 4, 2007: “Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, takes office as the first female Speaker of the House. Democrats assume control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate.”
  • January 11, 2007: “Bush announces what would be termed a “troop surge” in Iraq in an attempt to increase security in the capital of Baghdad and smother insurgency centers throughout the country.”
  •  
  • January 20, 2007: Hillary Clinton announces she is setting up an exploratory committee and will run in the 2008 primaries. Hillary Clinton runs her campaign assuming her nomination was inevitable. Clinton dominates the “Invisible Primary” of 2006-2007, the build up to the caucuses and primaries. Clinton’s 2002 vote to authorize the use of force in Iraq haunts her campaign, as did her campaign’s indecision as to emphasize her experience or her personality.
  • January 28, 2007: Republican Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee announces his candidacy.
  • January 31, 2007: Senator Joe Biden calls Obama “the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy.” Biden immediately apologizes.
  • February 5, 2007: Former Republican Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney announces his candidacy.
  • February 10, 2007: Barack Obama formally announces and launches his campaign on the steps of the old capitol building, Springfield, Illinois.
  • February 10, 2007: “General David Petraeus takes over command of the multinational forces in Iraq to oversee the surge.”
  • 2007: The Washington Post and other leading media outlets proclaim Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama and John Edwards the front-runners for the Democratic nomination, “leading in polls and fundraising and well ahead of the other major candidates.” Clinton leads in the polls until early 2008.
  • February 13, 2007: Former Tennessee Senator Fred Thompson announces his candidacy
  • Throughout 2007: Giuliani, remained at the top of the polls followed by McCain and former Tennessee Senator Fred Thompson who virtually tied for second place
  • March 6, 2007: “Scooter Libby, Vice President Cheney’s chief of staff, is convicted of perjury and obstruction of justice in the case of CIA operative, Valerie Plame Wilson, whose covert identity was exposed. President Bush later commutes Libby’s sentence.”
  • March 12, 2007: Republican Texas Congressman Ron Paul announces his candidacy.
  • April 25, 2007: Republican Arizona Senator John McCain officially launches his campaign in Portsmouth, New Hampshire saying, “I’m not the youngest candidate, but I am the most experienced.”
  • April 26, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Orangeburg, South Carolina
  • May 1, 2007: “Bush vetoes a war spending bill passed by Congress, which set a timetable for troop withdrawal from Iraq. Within days Bush reaches a record low approval rating.”
  • May 3, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Simi Valley, California
  • May 15, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Columbia, South Carolina; after the debate Giuliani and McCain are considered the front runners.
  • June 3, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Manchester, New Hampshire June 5, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Manchester, New Hampshire
  • June 12, 2007: Prohibition Convention (Dodge Faction) nominates Gene C. Amondson for President.
  • June 28, 2007: Democratic Candidates Forum in Washington, DC
  • June 29, 2007: The Supreme Court reverses an April decision and agrees to hear appeals from Guantanamo Bay detainees who have not had access to the federal courts.
  • July 23, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Charleston, South Carolina
  • July 26, 2007: “Congress passes the Antiterrorism Bill, which will allow for the screening of air and sea cargo and will give more money in government antiterrorism grants to states with the greatest risk for terrorist attacks.”
  • August 5, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Des Monies, Iowa
  • August 7, 2007: Democratic Candidates Forum in Chicago, Illinois
  • August 19, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Des Monies, Iowa
  • September 5, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Durham, New Hampshire
  • September 9, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Miami, Florida
  • September 13, 2007: Prohibition Convention nominates Gene C. Amondson for President.
  • September 26, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Hanover, New Hampshire
  • September 27, 2007: Republican Candidates Forum in Baltimore, Maryland
  • October 9, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Dearborn, Michigan
  • October 9, 2007: “The Dow Jones industrial average closes at 14,164, its all-time high. Soon after, it begins a steep decline.”
  • October 20, 2007: Socialist Party Convention Brian P. Moore for President.
  • October 30, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • October 21, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Orlando, Florida
  • November 15, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Las Vegas, Nevada
  • November 28, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in St. Petersburg, Florida
  • December 4, 2007: Democratic Candidates Radio Debate in Des Monies, Iowa
  • December 13, 2007: Democratic Candidates Debate in Johnston, Iowa
  • December 9, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Miami, Florida
  • December 12, 2007: Republican Candidates Debate in Johnston, Iowa
  • December 2007: Hillary Clinton amasses the most super delegates and leads nationally with 42 percent of likely voters. Obama has the support of 23 percent of likely voters, Edwards has 16 percent.
  • December 17, 2008: Former Democratic Vice-Presidential nominee and Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman endorses John McCain. After an endorsement by Senator Joseph Lieberman, McCain’s campaign rebounds, he wins the New Hampshire primary over favorites Rudy Giuliani and Mitt Romney.
  • January 1, 2008: Socialist Workers Party Convention nominates Róger Calero for President.
  • January 2, 2008: Myspace Democratic Primary: Barack Obama wins.
  • January 2, 2008: Myspace Republican Primary: Ron Paul wins.
  • January 3, 2008: Iowa Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 16 Hillary Clinton 15 John Edwards 14. Obama’s win in Iowa was the turning point that put him as the frontrunner, with higher polls numbers and candidate to beat for the nomination. Iowa Republican caucus: Mike Huckabee wins the Iowa primary, and hopes for a third-place finish in New Hampshire since his campaign is short on funds.
  • January 3, 2008: Joe Biden and Christopher Dodd withdraw after Iowa from the Democratic race.
  • Clinton campaign floundered after Iowa, The Vancouver Sun, “Campaign strategists had mapped a victory scenario that envisioned the former first lady wrapping up the Democratic presidential nomination by Super Tuesday on Feb. 5.”
  • January 5, 2008: Wyoming Republican caucus: Mitt Romney wins.
  • January 5, 2008: Democratic Candidates Debate in Manchester, New Hampshire. Four-person debate between Richardson, Edwards, Clinton and Obama on, Obama oversteps when Clinton is asked why some voters did not consider her likable. Obama interjects: “You’re likable enough, Hillary.” He claims he wants to be reassuring. Instead, he sounds condescending. As Obama and Edwards attack Clinton, the status quo candidate, Clinton dismisses Obama: “Making change is not about what you believe,” she said. “It’s not about a speech you make. It is about working hard.”
  • January 5, 2008: Republican Candidates Debate in Manchester, New Hampshire
  • January 6, 2008: Facebook Democratic Primary: Barack Obama wins.
  • January 6, 2008: Facebook Republican Primary: Ron Paul wins.
  • January 6, 2008: Republican Candidates Forum in Milford, New Hampshire
  • The Real Hillary: Prior to the New Hampshire primary Hillary Clinton holds a televised event in a Portsmouth coffee shop with 16 undecided voters, which is covered by about 100 journalists. Clinton’s voice wavered with emotion; she wins 39 percent of the vote, to Obama’s 36 percent. John Edwards, third with just 17 percent.
  • January 8, 2008: New Hampshire Democratic primary Barack Obama 9 Hillary Clinton 9 John Edwards 4
  • January 8, 2008 New Hampshire Republican primary: John McCain wins.
  • January 10, 2008: Republican Candidates Debate in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  • January 10, 2008: Bill Richardson withdraws from the Democratic race.
  • January 15, 2008 Michigan Republican primary
  • January 15, 2008: Democratic Candidates Debate in Las Vegas, Nevada
  • January 15, 2008: Michigan Democratic primary. Michigan does not comply with the Democratic National Committee’s Rules and Bylaws Committee’s new primary rules, and is stripped of their delegates for moving up the date of their primaries into January. Michigan looses all of its 128 delegates and 28 super delegates. The major nominees agree not to campaign as a penalty, additionally Edwards and Obama remove their names from the ballots. Hilary Clinton wins the primary, although 40% vote uncommitted in Michigan. She later fights for the delegations to be seated at the Democratic Convention.
  • January 17, 2008: US Party for Socialism & Liberation National Ticket selects as their nominees Gloria E. La Riva (California) for President and Eugene Puryear (DC) for Vice President.
  • January 18, 2008: “President Bush proposes a $145 billion stimulus package in response to a housing crisis and rapidly increasing oil prices. The package gives individuals several hundred dollars to facilitate spending, as well as rebates for children and tax deductions for businesses in order to jump-start the slowing economy.”
  • January 19, 2008: Nevada Democratic caucuses Barack Obama 13 Hillary Clinton 12 John Edwards 0
  • January 19, 2008: Nevada Republican caucus: Mitt Romney wins. South Carolina Republican primary: John McCain wins.
  • January 21, 2008: Democratic Candidates Debate in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  • January 22, 2008: Louisiana Republican caucus, closed non-binding, just selection of district delegates. Slate of pro-life delegates win.
  • January 22, 2008: Fred Thompson withdraws from the Republican race.
  • January 24, 2008: Republican Candidates Debate in Boca Raton, Florida.
  • January 24, 2008: Dennis Kucinich withdraws from the Democratic race.
  • January 25-February 5, 2008: Hawaii Republican caucus, closed: John McCain wins.
  • January 26, 2008: South Carolina Democratic primary: Barack Obama 25, Hillary Clinton 12, John Edwards 8. The turning point in Obama’s relationship with the African-American community came in South Carolina, when Bill Clinton alienates them by saying “Jesse Jackson won South Carolina in ‘84 and ‘88. Jackson ran a good campaign. And Obama ran a good campaign here.” Clinton’s remarks dismisses Obama, even though he has more than double Hillary Clinton’s votes, 55 percent to 27 percent, with John Edwards third at 18 percent. McCain wins by a small margin over Huckabee in South Carolina.
  • January 27, 2008: Caroline Kennedy and Senator Edward Kennedy endorse Barack Obama. Caroline Kennedy publishes an op-ed in The New York Times entitled “A President Like My Father.”
  • January 29, 2008: Florida Democratic primary: Barack Obama 67 Hillary Clinton 105 John Edwards 13. Florida does not comply with the Democratic National Committee’s Rules and Bylaws Committee’s new primary rules, and is stripped of its delegates for moving up the date of their primaries into January. The major nominees agree not to campaign as a penalty, additionally Edwards and Obama remove their names from the ballots. Hilary Clinton wins the primary. She later fights for the delegations to be seated at the Democratic Convention.
  • January 29, 2008: Florida Republican primary, closed: John McCain wins.
  • January 30, 2008: Republican Candidates Debate in Simi Valley, California
  • January 30, 2008: After Edwards places third in both New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries he announces he was suspending his campaign, but he does not endorse either of the candidates.
  • January 30, 2008: After Giuliani places third in the Florida primary; he withdraws and gives his support to McCain.
  • January 31, 2008: Democratic Candidates Debate in Los Angeles, California
  • February 1-February 3, 2008: Maine Republican caucus, closed. Mitt Romney wins.
  • February 1, 2008: “The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the U.S. economy lost more than 15,000 jobs during the previous month.”  It is the largest loss of jobs in four years.
  • February 1, 2008: MoveOn.org Presidential Vote Barack Obama wins.
  • February 2, 2008: Maine Republican caucus: Mitt Romney wins.
  • February 3, 2008: At a rally supporting Obama led by Michelle Obama at the UCLA campus, Oprah Winfrey, Caroline Kennedy and Stevie Wonder attend and Maria Shriver endorses Obama. Michelle Obama says, “For the first time in my adult life I am proud of my country because it feels like hope is finally making a comeback.” Her comment causes controversy.
  • February 2008?: Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger endorses McCain prior to the California primary on Super Tuesday.
  • February 5, 2008: Democratic Super Tuesday (largest-ever number of simultaneous state primary elections held) After 23 primaries, Hillary Clinton wins 834 delegates and 10 states to Obama’s 847 delegates and 13 states.  Cumulatively, Clinton garners 8,081,748 votes, 46 percent of the votes cast that day, while Obama’s 7,987,274 votes represent 45 percent cast. Clinton wins the crucial big states of California, New York, Massachusetts and New Jersey, while Obama picks up Illinois, Georgia, Connecticut, Colorado and Missouri, among others. Obama loses the California primary by 8.3%
    • Alabama Democratic primary: Barack Obama 27 Hillary Clinton 25
    • Alaska Democratic caucuses”  Barack Obama 9 Hillary Clinton 4
    • American Samoa Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 1 Hillary Clinton 2
    • Arizona Democratic primary: Barack Obama 25 Hillary Clinton 31
    • Arkansas Democratic primary: Barack Obama 8 Hillary Clinton 27
    • California Democratic primary: Barack Obama 166 Hillary Clinton 204
    • Colorado Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 35 Hillary Clinton 20
    • Connecticut Democratic primary: Barack Obama 26 Hillary Clinton 22
    • Delaware Democratic primary: Barack Obama 9 Hillary Clinton 6
    • Georgia Democratic primary: Barack Obama 60 Hillary Clinton 27
    • Idaho Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 15 Hillary Clinton 3
    • Illinois Democratic primary: Barack Obama 104 Hillary Clinton 49
    • Kansas Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 23 Hillary Clinton 9
    • Massachusetts Democratic primary: Barack Obama 38 Hillary Clinton 55
    • Minnesota Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 48 Hillary Clinton 24
    • Missouri Democratic primary: Barack Obama 36 Hillary Clinton 36
    • New Jersey Democratic primary: Barack Obama 48 Hillary Clinton 59
    • New Mexico Democratic primary: Barack Obama 12 Hillary Clinton 14
    • New York Democratic primary: Barack Obama 93 Hillary Clinton 139
    • North Dakota Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 8 Hillary Clinton 5
    • Oklahoma Democratic primary: Barack Obama 14 Hillary Clinton 24
    • Tennessee Democratic primary: Barack Obama 28 Hillary Clinton 40
    • Utah Democratic primary: Barack Obama 14 Hillary Clinton 9
  • February 5, 2008: Super Tuesday, Republican primaries: McCain wins Arizona (53 delegates), and nearly all of California’s 173 delegates, and wins seven other states, 602 delegates in total.  Huckabee is the “surprise performer”, he win five Southern states and 218 delegates; Romney wins seven states and 201 delegates. After Super Tuesday McCain is the front-runner. Mike Huckabee withdraws from the race.
    • Alabama Republican primary, open: Mike Huckabee wins.
    • Alaska Republican caucus, closed: Mike Huckabee wins.
    • Arizona Republican presidential preference election: John McCain wins.
    • Arkansas Republican primary, open: Mike Huckabee wins.
    • California Republican primary, closed: John McCain wins.
    • Colorado Republican caucus, closed: Mitt Romney wins.
    • Connecticut Republican primary, closed: John McCain wins.
    • Delaware Republican primary, closed: John McCain wins.
    • Georgia Republican primary, open: Mike Huckabee wins.
    • Illinois Republican presidential preference primary and delegate election, open: John McCain wins.
    • Massachusetts Republican primary, modified open: Mitt Romney wins.
    • Minnesota Republican caucus, open: Mitt Romney wins.
    • Missouri Republican primary, open: John McCain wins.
    • Montana Republican invited caucus: Mitt Romney wins.
    • New Jersey Republican primary, modified open: John McCain wins.
    • New York Republican primary, closed: John McCain wins.
    • North Dakota Republican caucus, closed: Mitt Romney wins.
    • Oklahoma Republican primary, closed: John McCain wins.
    • Tennessee Republican primary, open: Mike Huckabee wins.
    • Utah Republican primary, modified open: Mitt Romney wins.
    • West Virginia Republican convention, modified open: Mike Huckabee wins.
  • February 7, 2008: “The Senate passes a $170-billion stimulus package to give many Americans tax rebates as large as $600 or more, and to implement tax breaks for certain businesses in an effort to head-off impending economic slowdown.”
  • February 7, 2008: Republican candidate Mitt Romney suspends his campaign, claiming that if Republicans “forestall the launch of a national campaign and be making it easier for Senator Clinton or Obama to win”.
  • February 9, 2008: Louisiana Democratic primary: Barack Obama 33, Hillary Clinton 23; Nebraska Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 16 Hillary Clinton 8; U.S. Virgin Islands Democratic primary: Barack Obama 3 Hillary Clinton 0; Washington Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 52 Hillary Clinton 26
  • February 9, 2008: Kansas Republican caucus closed: Mike Huckabee wins.  Washington Republican caucus county/state convention: McCain wins by a small margin, Huckabee and Paul have a good showing; Louisiana Republican primary: Mike Huckabee wins, but does not win the 50% majority needed to receive delegate support.
  • February 10, 2008: Maine Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 15 Hillary Clinton 9
  • February 11, 2008: “Six detainees at Guantanamo Bay who were thought to have had roles in orchestrating the September 11 terrorist attacks are charged with conspiracy, murder in violation of the law of war, terrorism, and other charges. All six face the death penalty in military tribunals.”
  • February 12, 2008 District of Columbia Republican primary, Maryland Republican primary, Virginia primary: John McCain wins all three contests.
  • February 12, 2008: D.C. primary: Barack Obama 12 Hillary Clinton 3 Barack Obama 13 Hillary Clinton 2; Maryland primary: Barack Obama 42 Hillary Clinton 28 Barack Obama 43 Hillary Clinton 27; Virginia primary: Barack Obama 54 Hillary Clinton 29
  • February 5-12, 2008: Democrats Abroad primary Barack Obama 4½ Hillary Clinton 2½
  • February 14, 2008: Mitt Romney endorses John McCain.
  • February 19, 2008: Obama’s victories in Hawaii and Wisconsin give him a narrow lead in delegates over Clinton. Hawaii Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 14 6 Wisconsin Democratic primary: Barack Obama 42 Hillary Clinton 32
  • February 19, 2008: Wisconsin Republican primary, Washington primary: John McCain wins both contests.
  • February 21, 2008: Democratic Candidates Debate in Austin, Texas
  • February 23, 2008 American Samoa Republican caucus, Northern Mariana Islands Republican caucus: John McCain wins both contests.
  • February 24, 2008 Puerto Rico Republican caucus: John McCain wins.
  • February 26, 2008: Democratic Candidates Debate in Cleveland, Ohio
  • February 29, 2008: The Clinton campaign’s most memorable commercial; a National security ad. Clinton broadcasts a 30-second spot in Texas that begins with the phone ringing as children slept peacefully. “It’s 3 A.M. and your children are safely asleep,” the narrator asked in a too-calm voice, with patriotic music purring in the background. “Who do you want answering the phone?” Six rings later, Hillary Clinton, the supposedly experienced leader, answered. Color streamed into the picture, as America slept safely and soundly, with the right person in charge. It preys on concerns that Obama is too inexperienced, in an age of terrorism.
  • March 2, 2008: Obama’s friendship with a shady Chicago operator, Tony Rezko; NAFTA two-step, wherein one Obama adviser assures the Canadian embassy not to worry about his attacks on Free Trade.
  • March 4, 2008: Ohio Republican primary, Rhode Island Republican primary, Texas Republican open primary, Vermont Republican primary. John McCain clinches the 1,191 delegates needed to capture the Republican Presidential nomination, after he win Texas, Ohio, Vermont, and Rhode Island primaries.
  • March 4, 2008: Hillary Clinton wins Ohio, Rhode Island and Texas primaries, Obama wins the Texas caucuses, and therefore wins more delegates from Texas.
    • Ohio Democratic primary Barack Obama 67 Hillary Clinton 74
    • Rhode Island Democratic primary: Barack Obama 8 Hillary Clinton 13
    • Texas Democratic primary: Barack Obama 61 Hillary Clinton 65
    • Texas Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 38 Hillary Clinton 29
    • Vermont Democratic primary: Barack Obama 9 Hillary Clinton 6
  • March 4, 2008: Green Party Primary: Ralph Nader wins.
  • March 4, 2008: Constitutional Party Primary: Don J. Grundmann wins.
  • March 5, 2008: President George W. Bush endorses John McCain.
  • February 5, 2008: Libertarian Party Primary: Christine Smith wins.
  • March 7-8, 2008: 9th American Party Convention convenes in the Jacaranda Hotel in Avon Park, Florida, and nominates Diane Beall Templin for President and Linda Patterson for Vice President.
  • May 23–26, 2008: Libertarian National Convention convenes in Denver, Colorado. May 25, 2008: Libertarian National Convention nominates Bob Barr for President.
  • March 8, 2008: Guam Republican caucus: Mike Huckabee wins.
  • March 8, 2008: Wyoming caucuses: Barack Obama 7 Hillary Clinton 5
  • March 11, 2008: Mississippi Republican primary: John McCain wins.
  • March 11, 2008: Mississippi Democratic primary: Barack Obama 20 Hillary Clinton 13
  • March 13, 2008: ABC’s Brian Ross uncovered incendiary videotapes of the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, Barack Obama’s preacher and spiritual mentor, denouncing America. “We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York, and we never batted an eye,” Wright said in a sermon after September 11, suggesting “America’s chickens” came “home to roost” that day. In a 2003 sermon, Wright mocks the phrase “God Bless America,” proclaiming “No, no, no, God damn America….” The Wright controversy undermines Obama’s message of patriotic centrism, fed fears that Obama was a radical masquerading as a moderate.
  • March 11, 2008: New American Independent Party Primary: Frank McEnulty wins.
  • March 18, 2000: Obama delivers “A More Perfect Union” speech at the Constitution Center in Philadelphia, his speech on race. (Obama denounces Wright’s words, while placing them in the context of America’s tortured racial past.)
  • March 18, 2008: John McCain goes on a campaign trip to Europe and the Middle East, with Senators Lindsay Graham and Joe Lieberman.
  • March 23, 2008: Unity ’08 Convention results in no nominee.
  • March 25, 2008: Hillary Clinton confesses to have misspoken about remembering a warm, First-Lady-like welcome in Bosnia-Herzegovina as a difficult landing under a hail of sniper gunfire.
  • March 25, 2008: Former First Lady Nancy Reagan endorses John McCain.
  • April 5, 2008: U.S. Virgin Islands Republican caucus, uncommitted slate of delegates.
  • April 6, 2008: Obama speculates in a private fundraiser that bitterness over economic troubles made rural voters in Pennsylvania and elsewhere, “cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren’t like them.”
  • April 16, 2008: Democratic Candidates Debate in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • April 22, 2008: Pennsylvania Republican primary: John McCain wins.
  • April 22, 2008: Hillary Clinton wins the Pennsylvania primary with approximately 55% of the vote, almost 10% more than Obama; Obama leads in the delegate count, however, Clinton has more pledged superdelegates Pennsylvania Democratic primary: Barack Obama 73 Hillary Clinton 85.
  • April 23–26, 2008: Constitution Party National Convention convenes in Kansas City, Missouri and nominates Chuck Baldwin for President.
  • May 2008: 71 percent of Americans polled disapprove of Bush’s performance. This is first time more than 70 percent of Americans dislike their President. Bush’s unpopularity: Bush is the most unpopular President since political polling began. After Hurricane Katrina “everything changed,” the public disapproves of the federal response and handling of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • May 2008: Unpopular war in Iraq: CNN poll shows 68 percent of respondents disapprove of the Iraq war. The more unpopular the war became, the less popular Bush was. Bush could not tangibly convince Americans of the benefits of remaining to fight in Iraq, especially after WMDs – weapons of mass destruction were not found.
  • May 3, 2008: Guam Democratic caucuses: Barack Obama 2 Hillary Clinton 2
  • May 6, 2008: Indiana Republican primary: John McCain wins.
  • May 6, 2008: Indiana and North Carolina Democratic primaries: Clinton wins Indiana, by a small margin; pundits declare her campaign was all but over, since Obama led significantly in the delegate count. Obama wins the North Carolina primary by a significant margin, but lost Indiana to Clinton 50.56% to 49.44%. Indiana Democratic primary: Barack Obama 34 Hillary Clinton 38; North Carolina Democratic primary: Barack Obama 67 Hillary Clinton 48
  • May 13, 2008 Nebraska Republican primary, West Virginia Republican primary: John McCain wins both contests.
  • May 13, 2008: West Virginia Democratic primary: Barack Obama 8 Hillary Clinton 20
  • May 20, 2008: Kentucky Republican primary, Oregon Republican primary: John McCain wins both contests.
  • May 20, 2008: Kentucky Democratic primary: Barack Obama 14 Hillary Clinton 37 Oregon Democratic primary: Barack Obama 31 Hillary Clinton 21
  • May 27, 2008: Idaho Republican primary: John McCain wins.
  • May 31, 2008: Rules and Bylaws Committee of the Democratic Party decides to seat the delegations from Michigan and Florida, but they would only have half the vote value.
  • June 1, 2008: Puerto Rico Democratic primary: Barack Obama 17 Hillary Clinton 38
  • Clinton wins the majority of the remaining primaries, but still trails Obama in the delegate count. Hillary Clinton claimed to win a majority of the popular vote, but the Associated Press notes she only a has a small lead in only scenario.
  • June 3, 2008: South Dakota Republican primary, New Mexico Republican primary: John McCain wins both contests.
  • June 3, 2008: Montana primary: Barack Obama 9 Hillary Clinton 7; South Dakota primary: Barack Obama 6 Hillary Clinton 9. Obama clinches the Democratic Presidential nomination with the help of super delegate support and endorsements.
  • June 3, 2008: Clinton refuses to concede, she hinted that her campaign was coming to a close in a speech in New York.
  • June 3, 2008: Republican Primaries end with John McCain winning the most delegates.
  • June 3, 2008: Democratic Primaries end, Hillary Rodham Clinton wins the most delegates, but not the nomination.
  • June 4, 2008: John McCain challenges his opponent Barack Obama to a series of town hall debates, commencing on June 12. Obama declines.
  • June 5, 2008: “The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence finds, after a five-year study, that President Bush and other officials greatly exaggerated the evidence showing that Saddam Hussein held weapons of mass destruction.”
  • June 7, 2008: Hillary Clinton finally concedes to Obama, and pledges her full support.
  • June 12, 2008: Republican Ron Paul suspends his campaign, after remaining in the campaign after John McCain clinched the necessary number of delegate to receive the Republican Presidential nomination.
  • June 15, 2008 Boston Tea Party National Convention via the internet nominates Charles “CJ” Jay for President and Thomas L. Knapp MO for Vice President
  • June 16, 2008: Obama tells Jake Tapper of ABC News that just as the original attackers of the World Trade Center from 1993 were brought to justice within the Constitution’s boundaries, future terrorists could be fought legally but effectively. This comment allows Republicans to mock his “September 10” mentality, for treating terrorism as a domestic law enforcement issue not an external military threat.
  • June 16, 2008: Former Vice President Al Gore endorses Barack Obama.
  • Updated Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA): Civil liberties groups and the netroots denounced FISA, which McCain pronounces as a “vital national security matter.”
  • June 2008: Obama announces he would vote for the latest version, having opposed an earlier version, because the compromise bill reaffirmed the primacy of the FISA courts.
  • June 30, 2008: “In a new report issued on the situation in Iraq, the U.S. Army admits that while it was able to adequately topple Hussein’s regime, it did not have the capability to rebuild Iraq into a fully-functioning new country.”
  • July 10–13, 2008: Green Party National Convention convenes in Chicago, Illinois and nominates on July 12 Cynthia McKinney for President.
  • July 18–20, 2008, Reform Party National Convention convenes in Dallas, Texas and nominates on July 19 Ted C. Weill for President.
  • July 23–28, 2008: Barack Obama takes a campaign trip to Europe and the Middle East to increase his foreign policy credentials and prove he is experienced enough.
  • July 24, 2008: The highpoint of the most extensive mid-campaign foreign tour a presidential nominee ever undertook is when Obama addresses a crowd of 200,000 to 240,000 people at Berlin’s Victory Column. Obama’s mid-campaign foreign tour oversteps. Many Americans consider the tour presumptuous, disrespectful to the incumbent, and premature.
  • August 2-3, 2008: Peace and Freedom Party of California Convention convenes and nominates Ralph Nader for President.
  • August 16, 2008: The Civil Forum on the Presidency: Pastor Rick Warren moderates John McCain and Barack Obama at Warren’s Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California.
  • August 20, 2008: In an interview with Politico, when John McCain is asked how many houses he and his wife, Cindy, owned; McCain could not respond, “I think — I’ll have my staff get to you.” Both on the stump and in Obama’s ad, “Seven”, the gaffe was used to show that McCain was out of touch
  • August 23, 2008: Obama announces in Springfield, Illinois that he chose  Delaware Senator Joe Biden as his running mate. Obama selects a tough campaigner, a smart Washington insider, a bridge to working class whites and, most important, an experienced foreign policy hand.
  • August 25-28, 2008: Democratic National Convention convenes at the Pepsi Center and Invesco Field in Denver, Colorado. Nancy Pelosi (California) serves as chairperson. The convention nominates on the first ballot/acclamation Barack H. Obama (Illinois) for President and Joseph R. Biden (Delaware) for Vice President. Speeches given by Michelle Obama, Senator Barak Obama’s wife, Senator Hillary Clinton, former President Bill Clinton
  • August 26, 2008: Massachusetts Senator Edward “Ted” Kennedy gives a short speech supporting Obama although he is undergoing treatment for a malignant brain tumor. Senator Kennedy uses a combined message paraphrased from his brother, John F. Kennedy’s 1961 inaugural address and his own 1980 convention speech.
  • August 27, 2008: Hillary Rodham Clinton’s name is placed in the nomination to recognize her history making campaign, winning 1,896 state delegate votes and over 18,000,000 popular votes in the primaries and caucuses. Hillary Rodham Clinton suspends the state-by-state roll call vote she had demanded, and moves for the 2008 Democratic Convention to nominate Senator Barack Obama by acclamation. Network cameras zero in on African-Americans, young and old, beaming, as tears pour down their cheeks. For the first time in American history, a major political party nominates a black man to be president. Senator Obama secures the nomination with 2,201 of the necessary 2,118 delegate votes needed to win.
  • August 28, 2008: Barack Obama gives an address “The American Promise”  accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Denver. Obama choses to accept his nomination on the 45th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech. Obama also shifting the venue to an 80,000-seat stadium, the Denver Broncos’ Invesco Field for his acceptance speech on the convention’s forth night.
  • August 29, 2008: John McCain announces that he chose Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as his Vice Presidential running mate.
  • Soon after McCain chosoes Governor Sarah Palin as his running mate, she is forced to admit her 17-year-old daughter Bristol is five months pregnant, and would marry the father soon. The announcement is an attempt to repudiate blogosphere claims that Sarah Palin’s fifth child, Trig, was Bristol’s and the mother is covering up her daughter’s earlier pregnancy.
  • September 1-4, 2008: Republican National Convention convenes at the Xcel Energy Center in St Paul, Minnesota, and nominates on the 1st ballot John S. McCain (Arizona) for President and Sarah L. Palin (Alaska) for Vice President.
  • September 1, 2008: The first day of the convention’s schedule is curtailed when Hurricane Gustav hit Louisiana, and threatens to hit New Orleans; First Lady Laura Bush and Cindy McCain give short speeches.
  • September 2, 2008: The convention resumes normal proceedings on the second day, after Hurricane Gustav subsides with little damage
  • September 3, 2008: Conducted the roll call for the Presidential nomination, Arizona was allowed to vote out of order putting McCain over the top of the majority needed. Arizona was able to declare McCain the winner on the first ballot. Running mate Sarah Palin gives her acceptance speech.
  • September 4, 2008: Sarah Palin is nominated by acclamation. John McCain gives his address accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Republican National Convention in Saint Paul.
  • September 1-4, 2008: 10,000 protesters marched against the war in Iraq, while 2,000 marched to end homelessness and poverty.
  • September 7, 2008: “The U.S. government places Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac under its control to prevent the institutions from going under and endangering more than half of the country’s mortgages.”
  • September 24, 2008: McCain announces he is suspending his campaign and would probably skip the first debate on September 26 to fly back to Washington to help solve the crisis and would not continue his campaign until the crisis was resolved. The financial meltdown dooms the McCain campaign. Especially with McCain seemingly out of touch in his assessment of the economic mess declaring “The fundamentals of our economy are strong.”
  • September 11, 12, 2008: Sarah Palin stumbles badly in an interview with ABC’s Charles Gibson.
  • September 13, 2008: Tina Fey begins run on “Saturday Night Live” imitating Sarah Palin’s gaffes and missteps on the campaign trail.
  • September 24, 2008: Sarah Palin stumbles badly in an interview with CBS’s Katie Couric.
  • September 25, 2008: President George W. Bush invited both candidates to a White House meeting with key administration officials and Congressional leaders. Senator Obama asked some probing, intelligent questions during the meeting, while Senator McCain sat silently, impotently. McCain ultimately appears at the debate with the crisis still unresolved.
  • September 26, 2008: First Presidential Debate at the University of Mississippi (foreign policy/national security) and is moderated Jim Lehrer of PBS. Polls show  52 percent to 35 percent most Americans deem Obama the winner. McCain appears too prickly, condescendingly dismissing Obama as inexperienced or uncomprehending at least seven times.
  • October 22, 2008: Sarah Palin becomes more of a liability to Republican campaign. Word that the Republican National Committee has spent $150,000 outfitting Palin and her family, undercut her “just folks” image. Leaks from the McCain camp accuse her of being uncooperative and uncoachable, undermining the campaign. Palin infuriates Hillary Clinton supporters with her affect and her policy stands.
  • September 29, 2008: House Republicans reject the $700 billion bailout causing the Dow Jones to drop by 777.68 points, wiping out an estimated $1.2 trillion.
  • Rumors that Obama was Muslim, that he attended a radical madrasa in Indonesia, that he was an unpatriotic radical palling around with violent unreconstructed sixties radicals like the former Weather Underground Organization fugitive Bill Ayres, floated around the blogosphere making headlines.
  • October 2, 2008: Vice-Presidential Debate at Washington University, St. Louis, is moderated Gwen Ifill of PBS. Palin was probably stronger the first half, Biden was stronger in the second half with smooth, hard-hitting attacks that tagged McCain as George W. Bush redux and wrong on the war, the economy, the environment and energy.
  • October 7, 2008: Second Presidential Debate at Belmont University (town meeting, economy) is moderated Tom Brokaw formerly of NBC News.
  • October 15, 2008: Third Presidential Debate at Hofstra University (domestic/economic policy) is moderated by Bob Schieffer of CBS News. McCain repeatedly invokes Joe Wurzelbacher, a plumbing contractor in Holland, Ohio, whose confrontation with Barack Obama days earlier while Obama is campaigning door-to-door is broadcast over You Tube. McCain made “Joe the Plumber” into an American Everyman, the voice of the people, “Joe the plumber” joins McCain on the campaign trail
  • October 19, 2008: Bush’s former Secretary of State Colin Powell blamed McCain and Palin for stirring up nastiness in the campaign, saying his friend McCain was out of his depth economically, and that Palin is unqualified, and announces he is endorsing Obama.
  • October 26, 2008: Columbia University political union with Ralph Nader, Cynthia McKinney, and Chuck Baldwin is moderated by Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! The debate is broadcast on C-SPAN and on the Internet by Break-the-Matrix
  • October 29, 2008: Final Obama campaign surge, media blitz: Obama addresses crowds of as many as 100,000 voters. Obama returns to unity rhetoric “In one week’s time, at this defining moment in history, you can give this country the change we need.”Obama’s campaign spends four million dollars purchasing 30 minutes on CBS, NBC and Fox days before the campaign ended, for a prime-time candidate’s extended infomercial. Obama prime-time infomercial: Clips of Obama’s 2004 Democratic National Convention, photos of Obama’s parents, and canned footage of World War II workers. Excerpts of testimonies from Michelle Obama, Governor Bill Richardson, Senator Dick Durbin, and retired Brigadier General John Adams were interspersed. Viewers saw the candidate at rallies and heard him giving the voters a more direct – and uncharacteristically subdued — pitch. Obama was placed in a mock Oval Office, speaking substantively into the television cameras, and emphasized the nation was in crisis.
  • The polling leads switches at least three times; the two candidates are tied when the Democratic convention began. Obama surges after his convention, McCain surged after his. Obama starts running away with it after the financial meltdown.
  • November 4, 2008: Election Day; Democrats Barack Obama is elected President, and Joe Biden is elected Vice President.
  • November 16, 2008: Barack Obama resigns from his US Senate seat.
  • December 15, 2008: Presidential Electors cast the electoral vote.
  • January 8, 2009: Joint Session of Congress counts the Electoral votes with Vice President Dick Cheney presiding, the Electoral count remains the same as the final Election Day results.
  • January 15, 2009: Vice President-elect Joe Biden resigns from his US Senate seat.
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